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Hello, I'm Adam and this is Panda.

We are on unit five, lesson three, using the story Mouse Deer.

Let's see what's on the agenda today.

So for our warm-up today, a couple of fun nursery rhymes, and then after that we are going to do some reading and word work.

The reading from the story and the word work, to help us develop the language of how we describe a setting.

After that, we're going to step out the story.

So lots to do, let's start with the warm-up! Here's a nursery rhyme, that is just playful with words and the sounds that the words make, it's bit of a nonsense one.

But then, most of them are.

Higglety, pigglety, pop! Go try that.

Higglety, pigglety, pop! The dog has eaten the mop! The pig's in a hurry, the cat's in a flurry, Higglety, pigglety, pop.

It's silly isn't it? But fun, do you want to try it with me? Higglety, pigglety, pop! The dog has eaten the mop! the pig's in a hurry, the cat's in a flurry, Higglety, pigglety, pop! We could play with it.

What if the dog, ate a shop? Higglety, pigglety, pop! The dog has eaten a shop! The pig's in a flurry, the cat's eaten his curry, Higglety, pigglety, pop.

Higglety, pigglety, pop.

That was fun, let's do another one.

This next nursery rhyme is a song, and it's a song with a story in it.

And the story goes something like this, there's a king, and he's about to eat a black bird pie, but don't worry the black birds are quite safe because they start singing straight away.

Meanwhile, the queen is in the parlour eating bread and honey.

While the maid is hanging out clothes on the washing line.

And the black birds are so angry, they come and peck her on the nose.

It's a silly little story, and a silly little nursery rhyme! But it's fun.

It goes something like this.

♪ Sing a song of sixpence ♪ ♪ A pocket full of rye, ♪ ♪ Four and 20 black birds baked in a pie ♪ ♪ When the pie was opened ♪ ♪ The birds began to sing ♪ ♪ Wasn't that a dainty dish ♪ ♪ To set before the king ♪ ♪ The king was in his counting-house, ♪ ♪ Counting out his money ♪ ♪ The queen was in the parlour ♪ ♪ Eating bread and honey ♪ ♪ The maid was in the garden ♪ ♪ Hanging out the clothes ♪ ♪ When down came a black bird ♪ ♪ And pecked on her nose ♪ That was fun! Nursery rhyme done.

And now, it's time for reading.

So for our reading activity today, we're going to introduce a new high frequency word to go with the others we've been learning.

So this one has got one, two, three sounds.

big, a big word! We like this word, don't we? The word "big".

Because we've got big tiger in the story, should we sound it through again? We use what we know and we have a go.

B-I-G, big! Right, I wonder if we get big to work with some other words that we know? Let's start over here on the left.

Do you recognise this word? It's one of those words that we just have to know because we can't sound it out.

The tiger and mouse deer.

Well done, read it again.

The tiger and mouse deer.

We need to get the word "big" in there.

We've got a big tiger! Can you point on the screen where you think the word "big" could go? You're right, big tiger! The big tiger and mouse deer.

Well done.

Well, now it's time to explore some words that could help us describe a tropical rain forest.

So one of the things we're working on together in this unit, is how to describe a place, a setting in the story.

And we know that this story is set in a tropical rain forest, so we need to hear some rain.

I love the sound of rain like that, don't you? There are some great words to describe it, pitter-patter, pitter-patter, pitter-patter, pitter-patter, can you do that with me? Pitter-patter, pitter-patter, pitter-patter, pitter-patter, pitter-patter, good.

Let's stop the rain for a moment.

So the words, "pitter-patter, pitter-patter, pitter-patter, pitter-patter" sound a bit like rain falling and hitting leaves.

Up in the trees, there could be some monkeys, and they could be chittering and chattering.

So through the chitter-chatter, chitter-chatter, of the monkeys, should we do that? Through the chitter-chatter, chitter-chatter, of the monkeys, brilliant.

So we've got, through the pitter-patter, pitter-patter, of the rain, the tiger hunted.

Through the chitter-chatter, chitter-chatter, of the monkeys, the tiger prowled.

Prowled is a brilliant word for describing the slow movement of a tiger as he hunts.

In fact, any animal that walks slowly like that.

Our cat, he walks like that too.

So we've got the sound of monkeys, and the sound of pitter-patter rain.

When the rain has passed, there's a different sound from rain a drip-drop.

Through the drip-drop, drip-drop of the rain drops.

Should we do that together? Through the drip-drop, drip-drop, of the raindrops, good.

And finally, we thought about the sound the paws of the tiger might make as they squelched in the soft ground, muddy ground, squelch-squerch, squelch-squerch.

Those would all help us describe the setting.

Should we do it together? And maybe we could do it, through the rain? Through the pitter-patter, pitter-patter, of the rain, the tiger hunted.

Through the chitter-chatter, chitter-chatter, of the monkeys, the tiger prowled.

Through the drip-drop, drip-drop, of the rain drops, the tiger hunted.

Through the squelch-squerch, squelch-squerch, of his paws, the tiger prowled.

Well done, rain stop.

So if we could do that in our story telling, it would help describe the setting.

Now I think it's time we had a quick look at the story map, before we step it out.

So these pictures here are a story map, if we follow the pictures, it helps us remember the story.

So before we step it out together, I thought it would be a good idea to look at the pictures.

So it starts in the forest, and we've been exploring the sounds there, haven't we? The pitter-patter of the rain, and the chitter-chatter of the monkeys.

Anyway, this tiger is hungry, and he leaps, and he roars, and he says, "Mouse Deer, I'm going to eat you!" She says, "You can't eat me, I'm too busy.

I'm guarding the king's pudding." "Oh, can I try some?", says Tiger.

And while Tiger tastes the king's pudding, which is really mud, Mouse Deer disappears.

Follow the arrows.

The next time the tiger finds Mouse Deer, she is by a tree.

And he says, "I'm going to eat you for my dinner!" And she says, "I'm sorry, I can't be your dinner because I am guarding the king's drum." And she says, "The king's drum is here." But we know, don't we? That it's a wasps nest! And when the tiger hits the king's drum, he gets stung by wasps.

He's getting more and more angry.

Finally, he sees Mouse Deer, here by a snake.

And he roars and says, "I'm going to eat you now!" And she says, "You can't eat me, I'm too busy, I'm guarding the king's belt." And the tiger is so excited about trying on the king's belt that Mouse Deer escapes.

She's so quick, and clever, and resourceful.

She can outwit a strong hunting tiger.

And finally, very finally, the snake coils around the tiger.

And the last thing the tiger hears is.

♪ I'm quick and I'm sharp ♪ ♪ And I have no fear ♪ ♪ who am I ♪ ♪ I'm the little mouse deer.

♪ And that's the story of how a quick, and clever, trickster Mouse Deer, escapes the big Tiger.

So we now, are going to step out the story.

So you can see, for this part of the lesson, I've chosen to stand up.

When I'm learning stories, this is what I do.

It's called stepping the story.

So I imagine there are some stepping stones, and I am going to imagine that they're square.

And every time I put my foot and I stand on the stepping stone, I'm going to do something, and say something, that helps me remember my story map, which is the story.

So I'm going to invite you, if you are able too, to stand up, and do these things with me.

And as I do them, I'm going to explain why I'm doing the actions.

Okay? Here we go.

My first step, once upon a time there was a.

You knew what I was going to say, didn't you? Should we do it together? Once upon a time there was a tiger and he was hungry.

You're right! Because when I do this, it reminds me that the tiger was hungry.

Pitter-patter, pitter-patter, pitter-patter, pitter-patter, Chitter-chatter, chitter-chatter, chitter-chatter, chitter-chatter.

Squelch-squerch, squelch-squerch.

The Tiger hears a song, he sees Mouse Deer.

" I'm going to eat you." "Uh-uh, I am guarding the king's pudding." "Can I try some? Yuck!" ♪ I'm quick and I'm sharp ♪ ♪ And I have no fear.

♪ He jumps again, ready? One, two, three.

" I'm going to eat you for my lunch." "Uh-uh, I am guarding the king's drum." "Oh, can I have a go?" Ouch, ouch, ouch, ouch, ouch, ouch, ouch! ♪ I'm quick and I'm sharp ♪ ♪ And I have no fear ♪ " I'm going to eat you for my evening dinner." "Uh-uh, I am guarding the king's belt." " Can I try the king's belt?" ♪ I'm quick and I'm sharp ♪ ♪ And I have no fear ♪ ♪ Who am I ♪ ♪ I'm a little mouse deer.

♪ I wasn't trying to say all the words, was I? I was just remembering the most memorable things.

Would you like to try that now? I'm going to pause the video, and I'd like you to see if you can step the story and act out the most important things you remember.

And when you're finished, we'll come back and we'll talk about what we're going to do next.

Good Luck! Time for work.

So how was that? Did you enjoy stepping the story? Could you see the story in your imagination? Visualise it as you told it? We've done a lot of work today.

We have learned two nursery rhymes, "Higglety, Pigglety" and "Sing a Song of Sixpence".

We've explored words to describe a tropical rain forest, and you have stepped the story.

In the next session, we're going to really concentrate on descriptive words.

The words that Mouse Deer uses to persuade Tiger to taste the mud, to hit a wasps nest, and to put on a snake.

We need to work hard on those words.

Anyway, we're looking forward to the next session very much.

So for the time being, keep on showing your stepping to people and we look forward to seeing you in the next sessions soon.

I hear pitter-patter down here right now.

I think it must be raining.

Time to get the washing in.

Bye Bye!.