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Contains depictions of discriminatory behaviour.

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Hi, my name is Ms. Speakman.

We're in lesson 3 of 14 of the human rights unit.

And in today's lesson, we'll be looking at prejudice and discrimination based on disability.

So the lesson we're about to complete contains reference to prejudice based on disability and also reference to abortion.

Some people, this will be a sensitive topic.

If that applies to you, you may want to do the rest of this lesson with a trusted adult nearby who can provide support.

So in our lesson today, we're going to look at Christian and Islamic views on prejudice and discrimination based on disability.

We're going to look at a case study of an actress called Sally Phillips, who talks about Down's Syndrome and the stigma surrounding it, and then in reference to abortion.

And then we're going to look at the role of positive discrimination.

So let's make sure we're ready, first of all, for our lesson, please.

We're going to need a pen or a pencil, a piece of paper, an exercise book, and a different colour pen ready for corrections.

Also going to need to make sure we've got a nice, quiet, clear working space.

So TV, music off.

Phone to one side if you're not using it for the lesson.

Perhaps maybe you've got a nice, clear desk space to work at or just away from somewhere so that you are nice and quiet so you can concentrate.

'Cause concentration means that you can learn better.

If you need to get yourself set up or grab any of those things, can you please pause the video now.

Then un-pause when you are ready to start learning.

Okay, brilliant.

Let's get started then.

So what is prejudice and discrimination based on disability? Well, prejudice and discrimination based on disability is treating people differently based on the judgments about their disability.

So if you have seen my lesson on prejudice and discrimination in general, prejudice is the idea of prejudging someone unfairly before you get to know them.

So we might often talk about that being in terms of the feelings, the thoughts you might have.

Discrimination is acting upon those prejudice.

So treating someone differently and actually the actions and the behaviour towards someone based on those prejudice.

Now it's really important to note, before we move on, that when we're going to be talking about prejudice and discrimination based on disability, we're going to talk about that in terms of a wide range of disabilities.

Remember the disabilities aren't always physical.

They could be learning disabilities, and those disabilities might not be immediately obvious either.

You might not be able to look at someone and say, "Oh yes, they definitely got disability." Some disabilities, of course, present themselves as physical disabilities, which are noticeable, but there are many disabilities which you would not be immediately, you would not immediately notice.

You might see, for example, when you get on public transport where it says like these seats reserved for those with disabilities or have trouble standing, et cetera, they often say on them, and I've seen this on trains, they say, "Please note that the disability may not always be noticeable." And just getting people to be aware that a disability doesn't always mean physical disability.

So some examples of discrimination against those who have disabilities will include things like people with disabilities not being given the same opportunities as those without.

Perhaps people, maybe people having prejudice against what someone with a disability can or can't do with regards to employment.

And there was also in the UK, children with Down's Syndrome were not allowed to go to mainstream school in the UK until 1970.

And so it's not until 1970 that children with Down's Syndrome could attend mainstream school.

This is often based on the prejudice that people believe those who Down's Syndrome would not learn as well as children in a mainstream school.

However, since 1917, since children with Down's Syndrome have been allowed into mainstream school, people have found that people with Down's Syndrome have learned just as well as other students in the mainstream school, and have coped really, really well with being taught in a mainstream environment.

So what is the UK law going to do about those with disabilities? How are they going to protect those people with disabilities? If you've watched my previous videos, you might be aware of the Equality Act 2010.

I'm going to go over it again anyway.

So before 2010, there were a number of different laws, which individually dealt with these, what we call protected characteristics, things like age, religion, gender, sexuality, disability.

These would be individual laws, which essentially said that it was an offence to discriminate based on those protective characteristics.

In 2010, the Equality Act was brought in, which essentially brings together all of those different protected characteristics under one bill, under one law.

So the Equality Act 2010 essentially gives legal rights for employment, education, access to services, facilities, buying, renting property, many other things.

Essentially it means that anyone with a protective characteristics is protected under that Equality Act 2010.

So if anyone is discriminated against, they can take whoever is discriminating them to court, essentially to challenge why they've been discriminated against.

So disability would be covered by the Equality Act 2010.

In 2006, the United Nations also had a convention on disability rights, essentially.

Again, how could the UN protect those with disabilities? So the UK law will deal with any instances where someone feels they've been discriminated against based on their disability.

In the majority of cases, this might be where an employee is fined for being found guilty of discriminating based on disability.

So what we're going to do now is I'm going to go through some questions with you.

So I'm going to sort of give you a little test, but it's to do with what we're going to be going on to looking at.

So I'm going to give you a question.

It's more for you to have a thing and just to get your brain starting to work thinking, okay, where are we going to go next with religious views on discrimination based on disability.

So I'm going to disappear.

I'm going to give you a question.

Don't worry.

It's not a really tricky question or anything.

It's just like a question just to get you to start thinking, jotting down some ideas, then we're going to look at at different religious views on prejudice and discrimination based on disability.

Now, I'm going to show this for you.

So I want you to answer the following question.

Spend about four minutes on this.

From what you know of Christian teaching, what do you think the Christian view on prejudice and discrimination based on disability will be? You might want to consider Jesus' miracles or Christians believe about the value of human life.

Those are the sorts of hints that you might find really useful when you're looking to answer this question.

So, as I said, spend about four minutes on this just jotting down your ideas from what you know of Christianity.

What do you think the Christian view on prejudice and discrimination based on disability will be? So pause video now, if we please, jot down your ideas.

Un-pause when you are ready.

Okay.

Thank you for writing down your thoughts.

I'm sure they are brilliant.

We're now going to look at specific Christian views on prejudice and discrimination based on disability.

Right at the beginning of the Bible, there is this story within Genesis of how humans were created.

Many Christians believe that in that story, all human beings are created equal in value, and then God made them in his image and his likeness.

What we mean by this is that humans don't look like God, but they will reflect the characteristics of God, and that every human life just because they've been created by God is sacred and special.

So nothing else makes them sacred and special on top of that.

So for example, you're not sacred and special because you've got loads of money or because you've got loads of clothes or because you've got nice car.

It's to do with this idea that you are created by God.

So Christians would say everyone, including those with disabilities, are created equal in the eyes of God.

And therefore, many Christians say it's unfair then, and it shouldn't be done to discriminate based on disability.

We might also then look to Jesus's miracles within Christianity to give some idea of what Christians would believe about prejudice and discrimination based on disability.

Jesus's miracles, especially those healing miracles, of one we'll look at in a bit more detail in a moment, teach many Christians to always look after the disabled, to show compassion and show love.

These healing miracles may give Christians an idea that Jesus himself wanted to help those who are marginalised in society, treated differently because of who they are, and therefore to follow his example as a perfect role model, and then we also have the verse, love your neighbour.

Now my students at my school always make like a comment like, "Miss, you hate us using love your neighbour." And I'm like, "Yes, I know, depending on how you use it." So just saying love your neighbour, therefore Christian's believe it's good to be loving is fine, but it's not the best way of explaining love your neighbour.

If you're going to be using love your neighbour, refer to agape love.

'Cause it just makes your answer so much better.

Because in the idea of love your neighbour, it's not Christian saying, "Oh, you should only love those that you love, like friends and family." It's talk about agape.

Agape is a Greek word, which means selfless, sacrificial, unconditional love.

It's this idea.

It's not just love for those people you are close to, that people that you personally like.

It's not about personal feeling towards them, is that agape love should be selfless.

So thinking the other person unconditional.

So no matter what that person's done, no matter who that person is.

And also sacrificial.

Should be willing to put yourself on the line for them.

So many Christians who believe that agape love tells them to treat everybody as their neighbour, whether they know them or whether they don't know them, whether they like them or they don't like them, and that means showing compassion to all people, including those with disabilities, and therefore prejudice and discrimination is the opposite of agape love.

So, as I said, we're going to look at specific Christian teaching on Jesus miracles as an example of why Christians might believe it's very important to help those with disabilities, and why prejudice and discrimination would be wrong.

So the picture here is a picture of the healing miracle where Jesus heals the man born blind.

Now in Jesus's time, many people would have believed that people with disabilities had these disabilities as some sort of punishment for sins.

So in the story, Jesus and his disciples come across the man born blind.

So he was born blind.

He didn't lose his sight in an accident or lose his sight through like a degenerative disease or anything, born blind, and his disciples ask is this man born blind because of his own sins or because of the sins of his parents? And because in those times that would have been the norm to think that one of those two things was the reason, and he would have been marginalised in society.

No one would have wanted to come near him.

They would have seen that as a sign of his sins, et cetera.

And Jesus replies to disciples, "Neither.

He's here to show God's work." And his disciples were slightly confused at first, and then Jesus heals the man so he can see again.

And Jesus talks to him about this idea of also being the light of the world.

This idea of a spiritual healing too.

Now, many people would interpret Jesus's healing miracles in sort of maybe a different way to how we might be talk about in a moment.

Mostly Christians might focus on the idea that Jesus's healing miracles are not just a physical healing, but also is spiritual healing.

In many of the healing miracles, Jesus refers to sins being forgiven or the possibility of sins being forgiven.

And so many Christians interpret this to say that God's love is for all people, that God is willing to give anything, that God's mercy is for all people, as well as this though, we can't ignore that in many of these miracles Jesus heals physically too.

And so many Christians would say they need to show compassion towards those people in the same way Jesus did.

Perhaps maybe they themselves might what to pray for somebody's healing, or they might want to show compassion and offer help to those with disabilities.

Of course, there may be instances where someone who's disabled says, "I don't need praying for because, you know, my disability doesn't hold me back.

I live a really, really good life." Perhaps maybe in some instances that person doesn't want any help from anybody and for their disability, they might say, "I don't need help." And so many Christians would say, "well, in that case, we should be working for essentially trying to stop prejudice and discrimination against those with disabilities." Because in these healing miracles, Jesus shows love and compassion to all of these people, not just the people without disabilities.

He specifically goes quite often to these people who are marginalised in society and helps them.

So for many Christians, this would be a perfect example of what it looks like to show compassion and why prejudice and discrimination based on disability would be wrong.

What we're going to move on to now is a multiple choice, quickfire questions.

I've really loved doing these 'cause they're a really good way of just testing knowledge really quickly.

It means when you're learning something new, you don't have to commit something down to paper for the first time, and think, "Well, not quite sure how to answer that." Essentially what happens is I give you a question.

There's two possible answers.

I then countdown from three, and then when I've finished my countdown, you say out loud or point to your screen which one you think is the correct answer.

We check it together.

I say, "Well done." Or perhaps maybe if you got it wrong, you think, "Oh, that's a shame," but then you think, "Okay, I need to go back over that another time." It's absolutely fine.

That's the purpose of these types of question is just to see how much we know so far.

And it could be quite possible that at the moment, there's something you still need to go over.

That's what learning is all about.

So what I'm going to do is I'm going to disappear.

I'm going to get started on these multiple choice, quickfire questions.

So are you ready? Most Christians believe that all humans are born equal.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good.

That is true.

Most Christians believe that because in the Genesis story all humans are created with equal value.

Most Christians believe Jesus taught that people with disabilities were being punished by God.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good, that was false.

It was the sort of thought at the time of Jesus, but Jesus himself seemed to overturn that when he talked about it with his disciples in the story of him healing the man born blind.

The story of Jesus' miracles teach Christians that it's important to show compassion to all people.

Is it true or false? Three, two, one.

Good.

That is true.

Agape love means you should only love those you are close to.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good.

That is false.

Agape love is self-sacrificial, unconditional love that should be shown to all people.

Well done if you've got all of those four correct.

It'd be really good if you have done, but if you haven't, of course, there are things to go back to, and that's absolutely fine.

But now we're going to move on to looking at Islamic views on prejudice and discrimination based on disability.

So like to start off with is doing what we just did for Christianity, but doing it for Islam.

So from what you know of Islamic teaching, what do you think the Muslim view on prejudice and discrimination based on disability will be? Some hints you might want to think about how Muslims believe Allah created humanity or Muslim views on the challenges in life.

We'll spend about four minutes on this question, please.

Once you spent four minutes on it and you've jotted down all of your ideas, and you can un-pause the video, and then we'll go through it together.

Brilliant.

Thank you for writing down your ideas.

Now I'm going to talk through Muslim views on prejudice and discrimination based on disability.

So we'll start off again with the creation of humans.

So Muslims believe that all humans are equal in value, as God made all humans including those with disabilities.

So Muslims would say that all human beings have been created of equal value, and therefore people with disabilities shouldn't be treated any differently.

We can also refer to some stories of the life of the prophet Muhammad who taught that people with disabilities should be looked after and treated with kindness.

There are some examples of where Muhammad talks with a woman with learning disabilities until she's happy, until she feels safe and comfortable.

And so many Muslims would say, "Look." If the prophet Muhammad was able to speak to someone with disability, to make them feel better, to show compassion towards them, then that's the sort of example that you should be also following in their life.

And because of this, because of the way that Mohammad treated those with disabilities, many early Muslim societies actually provided state care for the disabled, which would have been very different to what would have been there in the times before where often people with disabilities were marginalised.

Some early Muslim societies specifically had laws and state care that protected the rights of the disabled.

And so for many people and for many Muslims, Islam is actually ahead of the times in terms of caring for these people with disabilities.

And then also many Muslims might actually look at disability as something that Allah has given people as a test of their faith, but also acknowledging that in the Quran it says Allah won't give someone more than they can cope with.

Allah does not charge a soul except with that within its capacity.

What this essentially means is Muslims believe that Allah will give them tests in their life, things that they'll have to deal with, but not too much that they won't be able to cope with it.

So some Muslims believe that disabilities are there to test people during their life in some way or another.

Though, because of this or because of these teachings about equality, prophet Muhammad, the early Muslim state, and the Quran verse, many Muslims say prejudice and discrimination based on disability is wrong.

It is not okay to treat someone differently based on their disabilities.

So again, we're going to do some multiple choice, quickfire questions.

And then after that, we're going to do some sort of longer questions that bring what we've learned so far together.

So I'm going to disappear again so that we can do that.

Let's get started.

My Muslims believe humans are made in the image of God.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

It's false.

This a Christian teaching.

Many Muslims believe that humans are created equally, but not in the image of God.

Many Muslims believe Allah created all humans equal.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good.

That is true.

Many Muslims believe because disabilities may be seen as a test from Allah, they should not help those who have disabilities.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

That is false.

So yes, they may be seen as a test from Allah, but many Muslims still say that they should help those with disabilities and show compassion.

Well done if you've got those three correct.

As I said, now we're going to move on to some longer questions to test our understanding of what we've looked at so far.

So I want you to answer these two questions.

Spend about eight minutes on this.

'Cause you might want to be writing a fair amount.

Describe Christian teachings on prejudice and discrimination on the basis of disability, and describe Muslim teachings on prejudice and discrimination on the basis of disability.

I'd like you to write this in four sentences, please, not just to bullet point down ideas, but to explain in-full what are the different Christian views and what are the different Muslim views on prejudice and discrimination based on disability.

If you want to go back in the video and rewatch certain parts, then that's absolutely fine if you think that's going to be really helpful, but we're going to do is pause the video now, and then you're going to un-pause when you're ready to go through corrections with me.

Okay, so here is my paragraph for Christian teachings on prejudice and discrimination on the basis of disability.

Can you please make sure you've got your different coloured pen out ready, and then when I read through it, you can add things in a moment to your answer.

So one Christian teaching is all people should be treated equally because everyone is made in the image and likeness of God.

Another Christian teaching is that people should follow the example of Jesus and help those with disabilities, and this is what God wants.

This is shown through the story of Jesus curing the man who was born blind, as well as this, the teaching love your neighbour means showing agape love, self-sacrificial, unconditional love.

So Christians should be willing to help anyone regardless of who they are.

So if you need to make any corrections or you want to make any additions, please pause the video now and do so.

And then we'll move on to Islam.

Okay.

Islam.

One Muslim teaching is that people with disabilities should be treated with kindness and patience as this is how prophet Mohammad treated people disabilities.

Muslims will want to follow prophet Muhammad's example, and indeed some early Muslim societies did so by enacting laws to help those with disabilities.

While some Muslims believe disabilities may be a test from Allah to see if they can cope, many Muslims would still believe it's very important to help those with disabilities and not to discriminate against them.

So again, if you need to make any corrections, please pause the video and do that now.

And then we're going to look at a case study after this.

Okay, we're going to start off with looking at the case of Sally Phillips.

Now she's a British actor.

She's a comedian, a comedy writer, but also a mom of a son called Ollie who has Down's Syndrome.

In 2016, she created a documentary about antenatal screening for Down's Syndrome and her views on this.

She is a Christian, and quite often in interviews talks about her faith, as well as describing it alongside her journey with her son Ollie in Down's Syndrome, saying that often looking at her son Ollie, reminds her of God.

So first of all, I'm just going to pop up on the screen again, potentially.

There you go.

You might be wondering, "Okay, what is antenatal screening? What does that mean?" So essentially antenatal screening for Down's Syndrome, but it's also used for other conditions too, is testing to see her foetus is likely to have Down's Syndrome while a woman's still pregnant.

In the UK, the woman is then given the choice as to whether she wants to abort the pregnancy or not if there's a positive screening result for Down's Syndrome.

So essentially antenatal screening means before the birth.

So while a woman's pregnant, she will have these tests, and on the foetus to see whether or not the foetus has Down's Syndrome, and is uncommon for the doctors to give the woman the choice whether or not she wants to abort the pregnancy.

Now we'll talk about this in a bit more detail in a moment because Sally Phillips has very strong views on this, but first of all, let's just talk through some general views as to why someone may or may not want to abort a pregnancy because of Down's Syndrome.

So why someone might want to terminate the pregnancy might be for something such as they might see it as too much of a challenge to bring up a child with Down's Syndrome.

So they might find that they don't want to take on that responsibility or feel that they are not up to the responsibility, or might just find it is a huge challenge, or they may believe that the child will not have a good quality of life, including health risks.

So it is fairly common for children with Down's Syndrome to suffer from heart problems and may have to have a large number of operations.

Some may believe that that child might not have a good quality of life.

Although many people might argue that those people with Down's Syndrome do have a really good quality of life, and can lead normal lives just as those people without Down's Syndrome.

Why might someone not want to terminate the pregnancy then, 'cause we also need to look at both sides of the argument? Many people might say, "Well, look, the child is a gift, regardless of that challenge, regardless of what challenges come along with raising a child with Down's Syndrome, that child is a gift." And many people might also argue that having a child in general is a bit of a challenge.

And therefore that any child would be a gift, regardless of whether they've got Down's Syndrome or not.

And many people might believe that a person with Down's Syndrome still has a very good quality of life, can do a great many things.

I mean, even early we mentioned, didn't we, that that many children who go to mainstream school with Down's Syndrome perform just as well as students without Down's Syndrome.

Sort of both sides of the coin there in terms of why some people might want to terminate a pregnancy and why some people might not want to terminate a pregnancy because of a Down's Syndrome positive screening result.

So what was that Sally Phillips arguing about then in her documentary and more widely? Now, she argues that people with Down's Syndrome have a very good quality of life and make a really great contribution to society.

She talked about many instances where they can lead normal lives, enjoy everything else that people without Down's Syndrome would be able to enjoy and have jobs and have a family, and make a really positive contribution to society.

She also raises concerns over countries who have said to wiped out Down's Syndrome.

Some countries have got such good medical testing in terms of screening, that they can make something almost 99% accurate when they're screening Down's Syndrome.

And because of this, some countries have said that they in the last couple of years have had no births of Down's Syndrome children.

And so she's got concerns over those countries are looking to eradicate Down's Syndrome, and saying that you're looking at it is as if it's a problem, rather than acknowledging that there are amazing things that people with Down's Syndrome can offer and that people with Down's Syndrome have a great quality of life.

So she's concerned about those countries that look to be eradicated, wiping out Down's Syndrome through these screening tests, and essentially seeing it as something to get rid of.

And she also is very concerned about medical professionals not having great advice or not giving great advice for pregnant women with Down's Syndrome, and after the birth, raising a child with Down's Syndrome.

She says they don't seem to have a great understanding of Down's Syndrome, and a very.

Oh, I can't think of the word.

That they are quite forceful in asking a woman if she wants to terminate a pregnancy.

So Sally Phillips talks about in her documentary that every single midwife appointment, she has every single appointment she had at the hospital, whether it's a scan, et cetera, they kept saying to her, are you sure you don't want a termination? Are you sure you don't want to abort the pregnancy? Essentially, she felt quite pressured.

And she says she believes that many women would feel very pressured to abort a pregnancy when perhaps maybe they don't want to.

And she said that, you know, once that person said no, don't keep asking them.

But she's also concerned that midwives, doctors and medical professionals need to be able to give more advice in terms of helping raise a child with Down's Syndrome or the risks that come with it, et cetera, rather than pushing for terminations.

So she has a great number of concerns about the idea surrounding stigma of people with Down's Syndrome, what they can and can't do, their quality of life, and that she said see this as a gift, and that she gets so much joy out of her son Ollie.

So what we're going to do is do some multiple choice, quick fire questions now just to see if we can understand what was Sally Phillips arguing in her documentary, and why this is an issue for us to be talking about with prejudice and discrimination based on disability.

So I'm going to disappear again, and let's get started on that.

Sally Phillips believes people with Down's Syndrome can still have a good quality of life.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good.

That is true.

Antenatal screening happens after the baby is born.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

That is false.

Antenatal screening is before.

Some people may choose to terminate a pregnancy as they believe it might be too challenging to raise a child with Down's Syndrome.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

That is true.

Some people may choose that.

Sally Phillips is concerned by some countries wiping out Down's Syndrome via screening.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good.

That is true.

So she concerned about those countries that said that they'd been eradicated it.

So well done for answering those quickfire questions.

We're now going to move onto some longer questions just to check our understanding and to make sure we've got this down on paper.

So I'd like you to answer, please, these four questions.

Spend about 10 minutes on this.

So what is antenatal screening for Down's Syndrome? Give one reason why some people terminate a pregnancy because of Down's Syndrome.

Give one reason why some people would not terminate a pregnancy because of Down's Syndrome.

Explain Sally Phillips' view on the issue.

So I went to pause the video now.

Please, answer these four questions.

Un-pause when you're ready to go through answers.

Okay, I'm going to go through the first two.

Please, make sure you got a different coloured pen out ready for corrections.

So antenatal screening for Down's Syndrome is testing the foetus for Down's Syndrome to give the woman the choice as to whether to terminate the pregnancy if the foetus is shown to have Down's Syndrome.

That second question, some may say that they may see it as too much of a challenge to bring up a child with Down's Syndrome.

Some may believe that a child will not have a good quality of life.

If you need to make any corrections, please pause now, then we'll go through the other two answers.

Okay, some may see the child as a gift, regardless of the challenge.

Some may believe a person with Down's Syndrome still has a very good quality of life.

And Sally believes people with Down's Syndrome still have very good quality of life and can make a positive contribution to society.

She is concerned over lack of guidance and advice given to her during and after pregnancy and is concerned with countries who have said to have wiped out Down's Syndrome.

Again, if you need to make any corrections, can you please do so now by pausing the video, then un-pause when you are ready to move on, and we'll look at the idea of positive discrimination.

Okay.

So I'm just going to appear again.

Okay.

So what is positive discrimination? You may have heard this term before, perhaps maybe you haven't.

So obviously when we talk about discrimination and prejudice, they're often in quite negative terms, aren't we? Say that discrimination is negative.

So positive discrimination is essentially the act of giving certain groups preferential treatment because they had previously been discriminated against.

So those groups have previously been discriminated against.

So in this case, those with disabilities, it's essentially, positive discrimination is essentially giving them preferential treatment with certain things.

So for example, with disabilities, positive discrimination might be things like extra help provided with children in school with disabilities, perhaps, maybe with employees, it is creating more jobs specifically for those with disabilities, or that some jobs say that they will hire a certain amount of people with disabilities so that they are not discriminated against.

I might also talk about positive discrimination being, like I mentioned earlier, public transport, having specific seats for people with disabilities that are closer to the front of the bus, for example, or closer to the doors of the train.

So positive discrimination is essentially preferential treatment given to certain groups that have previously been discriminated against extra help in schools, jobs specifically for people with disabilities within a company, extra seating on a bus or a train, which is closer to the exit for ease of access.

So those are just some examples.

What I would like you to do for me is to think about your views on this.

I what to spend about three minutes on this.

What are your views on the use of positive discrimination to treat people favourably because they have been discriminated against in the past? So do you think it's a good thing? Do you think it's perhaps maybe not the right thing to do in certain situations? Completely down to you, as long as you can justify your opinion.

So I'd like you to write down your thoughts.

What are your views on positive discrimination? Is it good? Is there perhaps some things you disagree with in terms of positive discrimination.

As long as you have explained your answer, then there is no right or wrong answer.

So I'd spend three minutes on this.

Pause video now for me, please.

Un-pause when you're done.

Okay.

Amazing.

Well done.

Thanks so much for writing down your thoughts.

I'm sure they are fantastic.

So just want to say a huge thank you for taking part in the lesson today.

You've worked so hard.

We've looked at so many things today.

I really hope that this lesson has been useful, helpful, and enjoyable for you.

I really hope I get to see you again soon for more lessons in the human rights unit.

Thank you so much.

Goodbye.