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Hi, my name is Miss Speakman.

We'll be beginning the Human Rights Unit today.

We'll be on lesson one of 14, which is on social justice and human rights.

Now, I've really enjoyed this unit.

I think it's so topical and so relevant.

So many of the things that we talked about within this unit, you'll often see talked about in the news, you'll often see a sort of story surrounding it.

There's probably lots of stuff in here that you don't actually think, oh, actually, this is really relevant to what I'm doing in my RE GCSE.

So I hope that you will find it just as interesting as I do.

And I hope you learn lots.

Now in our lesson today, we're going to start off by looking at the concept of what social justice actually is, understand what we mean by human rights, learning about religious views on social justice, and then considering the idea of responsibility alongside the idea of human rights.

So there's a lot to cover today, but I really hope you find it interesting and find it a really good step forward, first introductory lesson into the Human Rights Unit, and then be ready for more lessons later on about specifics or social justice, human rights, all sorts, there's so much in this year, I think is so, so interesting.

So, let's make sure we're ready first.

No.

I've got a sensitive topic warning for you that's really, really important.

I'm trying to skip ahead.

No, it's laid out Miss Speakman.

So, the lesson we're about to complete contains reference to a story of someone being shot.

So for some people this will be a sensitive topic, if that does apply to you, you may want to do the rest of this lesson with a trusted adult nearby who can support you.

So we will be talking about a story, is a real life story.

So if it's sensitive topic for you, please bear this in mind.

Now I can skip ahead to the bit about what we need to be or what we need to have to be ready for our lesson.

So a pen or a pencil or a piece of paper and exercise book, and different coloured pen for corrections, please.

This is the really important things that we need for a lesson.

We're also going to need to make sure we've got a nice clear, quiet working space.

So TV, music off, phone to one side if you're not using it for lesson, a nice quiet space to work in and a nice clear space to work in.

So a desk would be a really good idea or sitting at a table away from all the noise.

If we've got TV, music on, we're looking at our phone all the time, we're distracted, we're not going to learn as well.

That's just the way it works.

So if you need to pause the video to get yourself sorted, to get your set up, please do so now and unpause when we are ready to move on.

Okay, brilliant, ready to learn? I'm so excited about teaching you today.

So I really, really hope you enjoy it.

So to start off with a key definition, and that is what do we mean by human rights? This whole lesson's about social justice and human rights.

We'll start with human rights.

What are they? So human rights are the basic entitlements of all human beings afforded to them simply because they are human.

What do we mean by that? Miss Speakman, that doesn't make any sense.

Let me explain it for you.

Essentially, what it means is, when I say that you have human rights, these are things all humans are entitled to and the reason they have those entitlements is because they are human.

So because you are a human, because I'm a human, we all have these basic rights, these basic human rights that we're all entitled to.

There's nothing else we've done to earn them.

There's not like I'm, I don't know, older than you, so I've got more human rights, no, nothing to do with age, nothing to do race, sex, gender.

The idea that human rights are the basic entitlements for all human beings because they are human.

We're going to delve into sort of what they are, why they're important.

But the first thing I'd like you to do is to write this down and please note, putting it this way.

So write this down for me please and pause the video, write down the definition, then we're going to start looking at it a bit more detail.

Okay, you wrote it down? Absolutely brilliant.

Let's start looking then at this in a little bit more detail.

So I've told you there are human rights, but then your next question might be like, where do they come from? And so the United Nations, which is a group of countries, drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948.

Can you think about why that might have happened in that year? Do you have any thoughts? Why would it have happened in 1948? If you're thinking, well, that was just after the Second World War then you're absolutely right.

Now, a group of countries essentially recognise what happened in Second World War, the atrocity of war.

But also, of course, the atrocities of the Holocaust and Second World War made them think there needs to be something to protect the rights of all human beings.

There needs to be something where you can hold people to account and say, look, you have broken this thing about human rights, therefore, we can do something about it.

And so this idea of not just writing down some human rights, is what you're allowed, these are the basic entitlements, but also then holding people responsible for their actions.

The aim was to ensure that all people had the same basic rights and therefore if a country goes against those basic human rights, they can be held responsible for it and punished accordingly.

So essentially what this means is if someone was to break the Declaration of Human Rights, so if a country was to violate those conditions, then the UN, this group of countries can impose sanctions on that country, these sanctions could be fined, trade embargoes, lots of different things that could be included.

People can go to court and be charged, prosecuted for violations of human rights.

So essentially, this is the idea of drafting something that all human beings could have these basic rights and those rights could be protected.

Countries were encouraged to sign the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

So of course, they are essentially saying we agree to follow this.

We also hope that citizens in our country will be protected from human rights violations too, and that we can be held to account if we don't follow it.

Some countries have not signed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, but that's within that country's own rights to do so.

No one can be forced to do it.

So the aim was, of course, everyone had basic human rights, but then also to make it really clear, everyone's responsible for making sure that people are entitled to these and actually get it.

They're not just entitled but they also are responsible for helping people to not have their rights encroached upon.

So for example, I might say I have a right to property.

But if then people have a right to be free, and that, of course, then stops people from owning slaves, essentially saying, we all have these rights, no one has the has the right to have more of these rights than another, if that makes sense.

So they've come from this idea of countries looking to say, let's now have something which we can hold people to account for and protect people.

So what I'd like to do, first of all, is to have a little think about them.

I'm not going to tell you, I've sort of given a couple of them away, but to think about it.

We're going to spend about three minutes on this question.

From what we've looked at so far, what I've explained so far, what rights do you think we should have simply because we are human? So what rights do we think all humans should be entitled to? You might not know any of the articles of the Declaration of Human Rights, that's absolutely fine.

But I want you to have a think about it.

First of all, what your initial thoughts? What rights we should we have simply because we are human, but pause the video now, please, write down your thoughts, spend about three minutes on it, unpause when you are ready to move on.

Okay, well done for writing down your thoughts.

I'm now going to give you some examples of some of the human rights that are within the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

So the 30 articles or sections of the UN Declaration of Human Rights, and even more rights.

So the idea is there's lots of things included in these 30 articles.

Some of them are a right to an education, a right to life, a right to be free and not to be enslaved, the right to a freedom of religion, and therefore the freedom to have no religion.

The right not to be discriminated against on the grounds of age, gender, race, ability, sexuality, and the freedom of expression.

Those are just a number of rights that we are afforded and entitled to because we are human.

No one has a different right to that, according to the UN Declaration of Human Rights, everyone is entitled to these rights.

Doesn't matter who they are, what they've done.

It's just because that person is a human, they're entitled to those rights.

So you may have written some of these down yourself, and you may have come up with some others that you might know are in the UN Declaration of Human Rights, absolutely fine.

These are just a sort of a couple that I think are the most important to look at, because there'll be things that we talked about within the human rights unit.

So we're going to have a look specifically at the right to education when we look at a case study later on, but we will look within the whole unit as quite a few of these specifically, the right not to be discriminated against.

We'll talk about that in the first couple of lessons within this unit.

So we might often say, okay, we've got the UN Declaration of Human Rights, the majority of countries have signed up to it.

There are things in place that if someone doesn't follow it, that there is sanctions in place, the UN can deal with that.

So why do we still have injustice in the world? If it's fairly clear that people in all these countries agree, why is it that we still have injustice? Why is it that some people are discriminated against? Why some people not having access to an education? Why is it that some people are not free to express their religion? So we need to think about what the causes of injustice are.

And to be honest, it's very, very difficult to pinpoint what those causes of injustice are.

It's probably likely to be a huge mixture of these things, and just historical things over time, which have led it to be that way.

It's really difficult with any of these things we talked about in this unit to pinpoint an exact cause.

And even within saying, well this a huge cause of this, doesn't mean it's the sole cause and there's so much more, we need look at.

So we're going to sort of briefly talk about it, as I said, it is important to recognise, actually, there'll be quite a lot of this stuff, which is far more complicated than it first seems. So some of the causes of injustice, first of all, might be poverty.

So someone living in poverty which, of course, in itself is an injustice, but it may also cause further injustice.

If someone is being treated unfairly and they're also living in poverty, it might make it difficult for them to overcome that situation.

So for example, we are very lucky in this country, the majority of us have access to lawyers.

If we are treated unfairly, there are ways in which we can deal with that within the justice system.

In some countries, access to a lawyer will be incredibly difficult.

And so if they're being treated unfairly, they will not be able to overcome that and that their poverty situation may impact that even further.

We also may have some examples within our countries but also within the world of unfair laws.

Where laws are in place, which actually don't treat everybody the same, and perhaps will be treat some groups of people differently.

There have been, like examples throughout history, the examples that still exist today now, where people are treated differently and those laws are in place in this country that are meant to protect them.

Poor climate perhaps maybe it's not often sort of top of people's thoughts as to what causes injustice can be a cause of injustice, where there is a poor climate or perhaps maybe places which have a large number of natural disasters.

The poor climate can impact even further into the causes of injustice.

And then, in turn, more injustice follows.

When someone has a poor infrastructure or not enough money because of the poor climate, this then impacts further injustice.

A lot of injustice is caused by ignorance, essentially, where someone isn't fully aware of the situation, doesn't know all the details, and therefore perhaps maybe is a prejudiced idea about something.

Is often the case when we see discrimination between different groups, it's often because someone doesn't quite understand the full situation in terms of race, religion, gender, etcetera.

Lots of times it comes from people not knowing a huge amount of information about what they're discriminating against.

We might have examples of unjust governments where perhaps maybe even though that country's signed up to the UN Declaration of Human Rights, their current leader or current government is unjust, that doesn't follow through on that.

Some of these countries can also be very secretive about what they're doing.

So it can be very hard for the UN to impose sanctions, and perhaps maybe sometimes even dangerous for the UN to try and get involved.

There have been instances within history of where an unjust government has been a cause of injustice.

And then of course, we've also got greed.

Greed could also be a cause of injustice where people take more than they're supposed to, just part of your selfish desires something which means it means that people go without.

Now as I said, there's so many different causes of injustice.

These doesn't cover all of them.

And in majority of cases where there is injustice, it's often a huge amount of mixture between them and some other things included.

So we can't just pinpoint it to one thing, but it is important to be aware of them, the more that we're aware of these causes of injustice, then the more that we are likely to be able to combat them and to to help people overcome that.

What we're going to do now then, is we're going to do what I call multiple choice quickfire questions.

What I really love about these is they are quick.

They test your knowledge really quickly.

And they're a really good way of just sort of thinking, what do I learn? What have I learned so far? What do I need to go back over? Am I secure on this knowledge? And it also means you don't have to commit something to paper, I often find on teaching something brand new to students.

They say, oh, I don't want to write it down.

I don't want to get it wrong.

And they even do that sometimes when they know the stuff really well.

This is a way of me saying, here's a question.

Give me an answer.

It's okay if you got it wrong, no one's going to have that record anywhere.

But of course, a really good way of then you saying, oh, I need to go back over.

I didn't quite get that.

Essentially, what I'm going to do is give you a question, there's going to be two possible answers.

I'm going to give you a three second countdown.

After that I expect you to say out loud or point to the screen, which one is the correct answer.

I will then give you the answer if I need to sort of elaborate on the answer and then after that, we'll just carry on to the next question.

At the end of those, you'll be able to think, okay, I've got all of those correct.

Well done.

You've got a couple of them incorrect.

That's absolutely fine.

Because it's just a way of checking your knowledge.

And it probably is the case at the first time round that you do these sorts of questions, there'll be some things you picked up, some things you didn't perhaps maybe, even though I told you to turn off your phone, perhaps maybe you looked at Snapchat notification.

And then you thought, oh, I didn't listen.

It's just a way of checking your understanding.

Of course, I hope that I'm interesting enough that you all, of course, pay attention.

So what I'm going to do is I'm going to disappear, and then I'm going to start asking you those questions.

Then we're going to get an idea of what have we learned so far, then we'll consider looking into religious views on human rights, social justice, what they can do to help.

So I'm going to disappear now, let's get started on multiple choice quickfire questions.

Human rights are for all humans.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good, that is true.

The human rights, the idea that all humans are entitled to it just because they're human.

Greed can be a cause of injustice, is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good, that is true can be a cause when people take more than they are entitled to, this can of course cause an imbalance and therefore be unjust.

Ignorance is a human right, according to the UN Declaration, is that true or false? Three, two, one.

False, no one has a human right to be ignorant, but of course it can be a cause of injustice.

The UN Declaration of Human Rights was published in 1948.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one, good, that is true.

So not long after the Second World War.

The UN Declaration of Human Rights says humans have a right not to be discriminated based on sexuality.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one True.

So essentially what we're saying here is, all humans have the right not to be discriminated based on their sexuality.

The UN Declaration of Human Rights says you do not have the right to be discriminated against based on race.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one, good, that is false.

The UN Declaration of Human Rights says you should not be discriminated based race.

So everyone is entitled to being treated fairly because of their race and that it shouldn't matter.

So now I'm going to ask you some questions which are similar but there's going to be four options this time.

It's going to be two of those, so don't worry too much about them getting too complicated.

Well done so far for keeping up.

Which of these cannot be considered a cause of injustice? Is it poverty, unfair laws, poor climate, freedom of expression? Three, two, one.

Good, freedom of expression, obviously.

Poverty, unfair laws, and poor climate can be considered a cause of injustice.

Freedom of expression is not a cause of injustice.

Which of these is not a human right according to the UN Declaration? Freedom from slavery, right to an education, poor climate, freedom of expression? Three, two, one.

Ir's poor climate.

No one has a human right to a poor climate.

I don't think we probably would want that, would we? Okay, so well done if you got both of those correct, well done for keeping up so far.

Let's move on.

Okay, now what I'm going to do is I'm going to test you on what you know so far, not been tested one.

So to see if you can name for me three human rights on the UN Declaration of Human Rights.

We've discussed some.

We've spent about three minutes on this, try and name for me three of them.

It could be any of the ones I've talked about.

You might know a couple others I haven't mentioned.

That's absolutely fine.

So pause the video now please, write them down, and then I'll give you some answers in a moment.

Okay, brilliant.

So here are the answers.

So you could have had, of course, a right to education, a right to life, a right to be free and not enslaved, the right to freedom of religion or freedom of no religion, the right not to be discriminated against on the grounds of age, gender, race, ability, sexuality, or freedom of expression.

If you've got any of those, absolutely well done.

If you've got three of those, give yourself a huge pat on the back and go, yes, I've done it.

If you need to make any corrections, it's also absolutely fine.

It's a way of us helping to sort of embed it into our long term memory to get used to what they are.

So if you need to make any corrections, please pause now, then after that, I'm going to see what you think Christians and Muslims will believe about social justice and also think about what social justice is.

Okay, cool.

Let's move on.

So what is social justice? So social justice is fixing the injustice of the society ensuring human rights.

Now we've looked, haven't we, the example that some countries, there may not be justice, there might be injustice in the society and where those human rights aren't being met.

Social justice, the idea of people working towards fixing that injustice and ensuring those people do have human rights.

Can we please make sure that we've written down this definition? So pause the video, write down this definition and what we'll do is start thinking about Christianity and Islam.

Okay, brilliant.

So let's get started on the Christian, Muslim views.

First things I'd like you to get thinking about what you think Christianity and Islam will say about social justice.

So you may already have some ideas and perhaps maybe you're not entirely sure, but what you know about Christianity and Islam already, what do you think they will say about human rights and social justice? Will they agree with the idea of helping out people with social justice? Do you think they'll agree to the idea of universal human rights? So I want you to pause the video, spend about five minutes on this, please write down your thoughts.

What do you think Christianity and Islam will say about human rights and social justice? Then unpause when you're ready to go through it with me.

All right, cool.

So well done for writing down those thoughts.

I know even though I can't physically see it, I know that's great.

So it's absolutely fine.

Let's go.

Let's look at what Christians believe about social justice and human rights.

So in Christianity, there's the idea of right in the beginning of Genesis, the first book in the Bible, that everyone is created by God in God's image.

This doesn't mean everyone looks like God, essentially means that many Christians believe that humans reflects the qualities of God and that every human life, regardless of who that human is and what that human does, that they are loved and cared for by God as part of God's creation.

Therefore, Christians say it's so important that they work for social justice, because everyone is important, everyone is sacred and special.

We also have the Golden Rule within Christianity.

This also actually comes up in many other religions too.

The Golden Rule teaches Christians that they should treat others as they would want to be treated themselves.

So there's probably been so many times in your life where you said something that's so unfair.

And you've really wanted that whatever has been unfair towards you to be overturned.

Essentially, we don't like to be treated unfairly.

Christians say, if we wouldn't want to be treated that way, then we should help others who are being treated that way.

Just as though we would hope that someone would help us in that situation.

So Christianity, Golden Rule says, treat others as you'd like to be treated, therefore, you should be working for social justice, ensuring that everyone has human rights, and that Christians themselves are responsible for making sure that they don't encroach on other people's human rights.

Within Christianity we also have a Christian ethical theory called Situation Ethics.

This essentially says that Christians should do the most loving thing.

This is based on a Greek type of love.

Greeks name agape.

Agape is selfless, self-sacrificial, unconditional love.

This means that no one should be treated differently because of who they are and what they've done, that everyone is deserving of this type of love.

Christians believe this is the type of love that God shows humanity and therefore it's the love that they should be showing other people.

Therefore working for social justice is the most loving thing to do.

Ensuring that people have human rights is the loving thing to do.

And we also have this really nice quotation I love using for across the whole human rights unit, which is Galatians 3:28, which is, "There's no difference between Jews and Gentiles," Gentiles are non Jews, "Between slaves and free people, between men and women; You are all one in union with Christ Jesus." Essentially saying, there's no difference between you.

It doesn't matter whether you're a different religion, a different gender, a different sex, whether you're a slave or a free person, of course, we hope now, although modern slavery exists, that no one's in slavery, essentially, no one is any different from each other that they're all loved and cared for by God.

And therefore Christians believe it's important to work for social justice because of those reasons.

Let's move on to Islam now.

Now Muslims believe that Adam was the first human made by God.

And many Muslims believe that Adam was made from seven different types of soil.

The story is that the angels had to collect the different types of soil from all the different corners of the world to then make Adam with.

So the idea that Muslims believe we were made from all sorts of different types of things that we shouldn't care about the differences between us, whether it's race, religion, gender, sexuality, etcetera.

Every human being is special and that every human being is loved by God, and therefore working for social justice is looking after God's creation as a good steward.

In Islam as well, we have the practise of Zakah, one of the five pillars of Islam, which means one of the five obligatory things that a Muslim has to do in that life, which is giving 2.

5% of their idle wealth to charity at the end of the year, it looks after the community.

Essentially, it's like a payment is given to people such as those living in poverty, those who have been enslaved, those who've been imprisoned, those who are refugees, essentially all those people that social justice looks to try and help fix the encroachment of human rights, so Muslim society is an obligation to help those people who are being treated unfairly.

So working for social justice is part of of Islam.

And then also Muslims to about Ummah, Now Ummah an Arabic means brotherhood or community.

Essentially, refers to the worldwide community of Muslims past, present, and future.

And therefore, for Muslims, it's important to work for social justice, not just for the people in the present, but working for social justice now will help future generations.

We're now going to do some more quickfire multiple choice questions.

I hope you're ready.

I'm going to disappear for that and then we're going to get started.

Christians and Muslims believe God created all humans.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good, that is true.

Christians may try to fight for social justice because of agape love.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good, that is true.

Agape love is selfless, sacrificial, unconditional love therefore should be shown to all people not just people you know.

Christians believe agape love is the love that God shows only to Christians.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

That's false.

Christians believe agape love is the love that God shows to everyone, not just to Christians.

Christians believe the Golden Rule means they should only care for their friends.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

That is false.

The idea of the Golden Rule is treat anyone how you'd like to be treated yourself.

Christians believe Adam was made from seven types of soil.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

That is false.

It's not Christians who believe that.

Muslims believe Adam was made from seven types of soil.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good, that is true.

It's Muslims that believe that, not Christians.

Some Muslims believe social justice is important to look after the Ummah, is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good, yes.

This idea of social justice to care for the Ummah present and future.

The money from Zakah can be used to help fight for social justice.

Is that true or false? Three, two, one.

Good.

The idea is true.

The money from Zakah goes towards helping those people who perhaps maybe are treated unfairly.

Well done if you got all of those correct, super, super impressive.

If you didn't get all of those correct, absolutely fine, 'cause it hopefully will highlight some of the things you need to go back over at a later date.

What we're going to do now is have a look at a case study of someone who worked for social justice, who was a victim of someone who had their human rights taken from them, treated unfairly 'cause of who they were, and then has made a difference.

So let's have a look then.

I'm just going to wait for my face to appear on the screen so I can talk you through it.

Okay, so you may have seen or heard of Malala before, Malala Yousafzai is a young girl who has gone on to do amazing things.

I think she's such an inspirational woman.

So essentially Malala as a young girl living in Pakistan, blogged quite often about how she believed that women should have a right to education in where she was living in Pakistan.

She was very vocal about it 'cause she really was passionate about it.

And she's a Muslim, and believed that every girl should have a right to education, everyone should have a right to education.

When she was blogging about this, the Taliban, a terrorist organisation, targeted her and shot her in the head.

Luckily, she survived and after that, she continued, she wasn't put off by this.

She didn't think, oh, I've been targeted, I've nearly been killed because of what I'm saying.

She still strongly believed that she should be telling everybody that women should have a right to education.

She continued with this, continued blogging, continue talking about it.

The story was huge when it first happened and most people heard about what happened to her.

She then won the Nobel Peace Prize and moved to the UK.

And I believe not very long ago, she received her degree from Oxford University.

She completed her GCSEs here and completed her exams, and has gone on to continue to fight for all women to have an education.

So I think she's very inspiring.

Someone who perhaps maybe you could imagine and could understand why perhaps maybe would feel scared to continue fighting for what she believed in.

But she genuinely had this personal conviction and stood by it, and has gone on to essentially do amazing things.

So what we're going to do now is I'm going to pause and I'm going to ask you some questions on this.

So I need to get rid of myself so we can ask the following questions, spend about five minutes on this just so that we can think about and to have nice and clearly on a piece of paper what it is that Malala was involved in, and what she was really fighting for.

So which human right is Malala most concerned with? How has Malala campaigned for social justice? And how may her faith have influenced her personal convictions? Of course, she was a Muslim.

So sentence starters are there for you to help you.

What I'd like you to do is to pause the video now for me, please, complete these questions, unpause when you're ready to go through the answers.

Okay, so going through the answers.

Malala Yousafzai is most concerned about the human right to an education.

Malala has campaigned for social justice by blogging about the right to education of girls in Swat, Pakistan.

This led to the Taliban targeting her and shooting her in the head.

Since then she has campaigned for the right to education of children worldwide and won the Nobel Peace Prize.

Malala is a Muslim, this may have influenced her because many Muslims believe that as all humans come from God they should be treated equally, and this includes the equal right to education.

If you need to make any corrections, can you please make sure you've got your different coloured pen out and that you are making your corrections by pausing the video and unpausing when you are ready to move on.

Okay, so I'm just going to appear on the screen.

Eventually.

Okay, so what we're going to do now is explain from two religious traditions attitudes towards social justice.

So we're going to put this into practise and do an exam style question.

Now the explained questions will be slightly different for each exam board.

So it's a really good idea to ask your teacher which exam board you are sitting.

Nevertheless, if you're not able to ask them that exactly now, then still doing the question will be really, really helpful for practising what we've looked at so far today and then you can check with a teacher whether it fits with the exam you're sitting.

This question above best fits with Eduquas and WJEC.

You might be asked to write shorter explain questions about AQA and Edexcel, and the question style might look a little bit different for OCR.

Essentially, what we're going to do is I'm going to give you sort of a structure, give you what I'd like you to include, to make it a lot easier for you to tackle one of these sorts of questions.

So don't worry if you're worried about doing exam question.

I'll run you through it.

We've got this.

So there's no need to go away again.

So all examples have questions in their exam that I should explain.

You need to answer this question by writing two paragraphs to explain from two religious traditions, attitudes towards social justice.

It's really important that we include things like what social justice is, Christina attitudes and Muslim attitudes.

So we need to make sure we write in two paragraphs to explain from two religious traditions, attitudes towards social justice.

Explaining is different just to describing within Eduquas because you need to give the how and the why, not just the what.

So when applied to this question, you'd say what Christians and Muslims believe about social justice and why they have these attitudes? For example, telling me what they believe, and then give me justification behind that.

So I'm going to give you a possible structure.

So you need to have perhaps maybe give me a definition of what social justice is, and then also Christine's attitude towards it.

Then two reasons why Christians might want to fight for social justice, so reasons why it's important, then Muslim attitudes to social justice and two reasons Muslims might want to fight for it.

And then give me an example of someone putting those values into action.

So talk about Malala, for example.

So here is my structure that I'd like you to use.

You can use all of these sentence starters.

Where there's things in brackets is where you might need to add things.

And where there are little dot dot dots, that's where you need to add things too.

So I'm going to pause here and use this structure to write your answer.

Then I want you to unpause when you're ready to look through corrections, please.

Okay, if you can see this screen, then I want your different coloured pen out ready for corrections.

If you're not quite done, then you can rewind the video and carry on.

If not, we're going to start going through, I'm going to give you a model answer and I'll give you a chance then to correct and look at what it should look like.

So this is half of my answer, then I have to go through the Muslim bit too.

Social justice is fixing the injustices of a society and ensuring human rights.

Many Christians believe they should do as much as they can for social justice.

One reason a Christian might want to fight for social justice is because they follow the principle from Situation Ethics that they should do the most loving thing in every situation, putting agape love into practise.

Another reason a Christian might want to fight for social justice is because of the Bible teaching, there is no difference between Jews and Gentiles.

You are all one in union with Christ Jesus, which implies that all people are equal.

With this, yours doesn't have to be exactly the same as mine.

But you might find some of this useful, so please pause the video now, make corrections, and then unpause and we'll have a look at the Islam section of the answer.

Okay, Islam section.

Many Muslims believe that they should fight for social justice.

One reason a Muslim might want to fight for social justice because they believe that all humans are made by God and so have an equal status.

Another reason a Muslim might want to fight for social justice is because giving Zakah, which teaches them to look after the Ummah, no matter where they are in the world.

One person who puts those beliefs into action is Malala Yousafzai.

She campaigns for the right of every child to have an education even though she was targeted and shot by the Taliban.

Again, yours doesn't have to be word for word like mine.

But if you need to make corrections or to add anything, please pause the video now, do that in your different coloured pen, unpause when you're ready.

Okay, just going to appear again.

Okay, huge, huge thank you.

And huge, huge well done for completing a super, super fantastic lesson.

I'm really impressed with all the work you've done, being super interested, keeping engaged.

Unless of course, you've been looking at your phone the whole time, then I'm not as impressed.

Either way, the work you've produced today is great.

And I'm really, really proud of you.

Really hoping I get to see you again soon for another lesson.

Thank you very much.

Goodbye.