warning

Content guidance

Equipment requiring safe usage.

Adult supervision recommended.

video

Lesson video

In progress...

Loading...

Hello, and welcome back to your design and technology lesson.

I'm Mrs. Mee.

And I'm going to be teaching you cooking and nutrition.

We're on session three now.

So previously we've explored where our food comes from, we've also explored culture and seasonality, and today we're going to be looking at understanding the needs of a healthy and varied diet.

Okay, so today's lesson, we are going to be exploring and understanding the needs of a healthy and varied diet.

So before we begin, let's just have a look at some of our rules.

Now, remember the rules were, to have fun, to explore and experiment with your ideas to be confident, but also to play safe especially when we start actually making food products.

And don't be worried if you make a mistake because the next mistake could be your next big idea.

So just enjoy exploring and experimenting with your design ideas.

So let's have a look at what we're going to be looking at in today's lesson.

So we're going to be looking at our investigative and evaluative activities.

We're also going to start exploring some design tasks.

We're also then going to be looking at what a healthy and varied diet looks like, and hopefully remind you about what you already know.

We're then going to be looking at how to select from a range of ingredients to actually make a food product.

And we're then going to be looking at how we can design a soup which will help us move on to our next lesson where you're actually make your own soup.

So we are going to be using lots of key words during this lesson.

Let's just go through some of the key words that we're going to be looking at.

So the first word we're going to be exploring is healthy.

So we're going to be looking at our diet and what we need to be healthy.

So healthy is what we need to be fit and well.

So we'll talk about that during the lesson.

We'll also talk about the need for a varied diet.

And that is to have a broad range of foods as part of our diets.

We'll also be talking about values and we'll refer to the moral or religious beliefs that shape a person's diet.

And then we're going to be looking at the word nutrition.

So this is a process providing and obtaining the food necessary for health and growth.

So some other key words we're going to be looking at is users preferences.

So this what a person would choose out of the options available to them.

We'll also look at the users wants which we've looked at previously.

And this refers to the things which we desire to eat.

We'll look at needs.

And these are things that are essential in a person's diet for various reasons which we'll go on to as we explore today's lesson.

And then the final word which we've already used is diet.

And this is the food that a person chooses to eat because of their wants, needs or values.

So in this lesson you are going to be needing paper and a pencil.

So what I'd ask you to do now is pause the video, go and get yourself ready, make sure you have plenty of room and you're working in a nice quiet space where you can concentrate.

And when you're ready, come back to me.

So now we're going to look at what a healthy and varied diet looks like.

So we're going to be looking at some foods and we're going to be looking at what we'd need in our diet to ensure that it's healthy and that it's varied.

So here's some foods.

Can you give me some examples of types of food that you would include in a varied and healthy diet? So I'm going to show you some examples of foods.

We've got salad, we've got dairy products, we've got meat, fruits, vegetables, rice, bread and pasta.

Would those be example of foods that you'd find in a healthy and varied diet? Yes, they would.

Now ,if your diet consisted of just pasta, which I know for some people, my nephew included, it does just include pasta.

Is that healthy and varied, no.

So if as an individual you're eating just one of those products, then it's not healthy and it's not varied.

So we need to have a diet that includes lots of those foods.

And we can go to some guidance.

So I'm just going to show you this document here.

This is called the Eatwell Guide.

And you can get a copy of an interactive version of the Eatwell Guide.

If you go onto the NHS Food Standards Agency, you can actually access this interactively.

So this is the Eatwell Guide.

So let's just have a look at that plate.

So that plate teaches us about how much of each of the different types of food we should have in our diet.

So that plate is splitted up into different sections.

So there's two really, really large sections there.

So what sort of foods are in those larger sections? That's correct.

Yes, so fruit and vegetables.

So fruit and vegetables as you can see, are what we should have a majority of in our diets to make it healthy and varied.

So that is telling us that the majority of our meal should include lots of fruit and lots of vegetables.

Now the guidance is, we should have five pieces of fruit and veg a day.

So that's our guidance to make it really simple.

So that's the main dish.

If you're designing a dish to be eaten, whether it's for your breakfast, your lunch or your dinner, you need to make sure it has a variety of foods based on this guidance.

The majority, the percent, the most biggest percentage of food should be fruit and vegetables.

And then the next larger quantity of food that we should have on our plates is? Yes, it's carbohydrates.

So that is things like pasta, rice, cereals, breads, all of those items there are carbohydrates.

So that's what makes.

So we need a good mix of fruit and vegetables and a good mix of carbohydrates.

And then we need a smaller percentage of some of the other foods.

So what are the other foods that we should include in our diet? That's right.

We need protein.

So protein we can get from meat.

We can also get it from things like beans and pulses because some of us don't eat meat.

So obviously we need to make sure that we're eating protein and we're getting it from somewhere else.

So that gives us guidance of the types of things that are really rich in protein.

And then we've got a smaller section that we need to include in our diet.

That's right, dairy.

So dairy or indeed alternatives.

So that things like milk and cheese and alternatives like soya milk and oat milk.

All of these things are going to help give us a broad and balanced and varied diets.

And then we need a small percentage or can have a small percentage to make it healthy and varied of things like oils and spreads.

So we can't smother our meal in lots of oil because that would include too much fat in our diets.

So this Eatwell Guide, something that you're going to be using when we explore the next couple of tasks.

So this gives you guidance of what should be on your plate.

Now, does that mean I can't eat chocolate? Does that mean I can't eat cake? Absolutely not.

I can eat chocolate and I can eat cake, and indeed I have had a cake today.

But I need to limit the amount that I have.

So I can't replace a meal for instance for a chocolate bar or a big slice of cake, because that wouldn't make me healthy.

It wouldn't give me the nutrients that I need to help me grow and to give me energy.

So that Eatwell Guide, sorry gives you the key guidance of what you should include on your plate.

Okay, so now we're going to have a look at carrying out a task to see if you understand what a healthy and varied diet looks like.

So this task I've given you an example, breakfast, lunch and dinner.

And what I'd like you to do is have a look at that example, breakfast, lunch and dinner.

And I'd like you to evaluate the meal choices.

I'd like you to think about, is this a healthy and varied diet? What is missing from these dishes? What could we change in terms of these options to make these dishes healthier? So pause the video.

You can access this worksheet if you want or you can just make a note of these food products on your piece of paper or in your book.

So just jot these down and then think about what's missing.

So reflect back to your Eatwell Guide.

And remember you can access the Eatwell Guide by going on to NHS, England and typing and Eatwell Guide.

And you can access an interactive version of the Eatwell Guide to help you.

So looking at those choices, what's missing from the diet? What is there not any of? So let's think about the Eatwell Guide.

We've got fruits and vegetables, carbohydrates, protein and dairy products.

And we've also got, we were allowed to have a small percentage of oils and spreads.

So what's missing from those plates? Have a little think.

That's right, fruits and vegetables.

So fruits and vegetables is one thing that's missing.

So I'd like you to pause the video, have a little go at thinking about how you could modify those meals to make it a little bit more healthy and a little bit more varied.

Okay, so hopefully you've had a go at looking at what you could change.

Now, you don't need to redesign this diet.

We're just looking at making slight changes and slight modifications.

So I've had to go at this task as well.

So I'm just going to show you what changes I've made.

So as you can see, I've made some slight changes and modifications to the diet to make it a little bit more healthy and a little bit more varied.

So the first change I've made is I've replaced the breakfast choice.

I've replaced it from crunching up cornflakes to cornflakes.

Why do you think I've done that? That's right.

I've tried to reduce the amount of sugar, because crunching up cornflakes has a lot of added sugar, and although they're delicious and they're okay in moderation, to eat those every day, my sugar content in my diet would increase.

So I've made that slight change and I've chosen a cereal, which is a carbohydrate which does not have any added sugar.

I've also then made a modification to the milk.

So I've gone from whole milk to semi-skimmed to try and reduce the main fat content in my diet.

And then in the lunch modifications, if you look, we had originally a sandwich, a cheese sandwich on white bread.

So the slight change I've made is I've selected brown bread because brown bread is healthier for us.

So I've made just a slight tweak to the sandwich choice not taking away the cheese, because we do need dairy in our diet.

So cheese has lots of nutrients that's good for us.

And then what I've done is I've made a change to the other items. So if you remember, we had crisps, chocolate and cola.

Now, all of those things contain lots of fats, sugar which are okay in moderation, but have lots of them, it's not really very good for your diet.

So what I've done is I've replaced the crisp vegetable sticks because as you know, these plates have no fruit and vegetables.

And then I've added a piece of fruit and then I've replaced the cola for water or squash.

So I'm reducing the fat and the sugar content.

And then if we look at the dinner option, originally, we had chips and pizza.

So the slight modification, our pizza in moderation is really good for you, you've got carbohydrates on the base and the pizza could have lots of vegetable toppings.

You can even have fruit on your pizza.

You can have what you like on your pizza actually.

So what I've done with that, is I've changed the chips to potato wedges to try and reduce the fat content.

And then I've simply replaced the cake with a yoghourt and I've replaced the lemonade with squash.

So now you can see how I've changed the daily diet to make it a little bit more healthy and varied.

So what I'd like you to do now using this blank menu, I would like you to design your own menu for the day.

So let's take tomorrow.

What are you going to eat for your breakfast, your lunch and your dinner tomorrow, to make sure that your diet is healthy and varied? So I'd like you to access the interactive Eatwell Guide to help you.

And I'd like you to design a menu for what you might eat at breakfast, what you might eat lunch and what you might eat for dinner.

So pause the video.

You can access this sheet using the worksheets or you can just draw this table in your book or on your sheet of paper and you can fill it in.

I'm going to give you some time today there once you've completed that task, resume the video and we will move on.

Brilliant.

Okay, so hopefully by now, you've actually designed yourself a healthy and varied meal plan.

Now, what I'd like you to do is pop those meal choices onto your eat, well, this blank eatwell plate just to evaluate whether it is a healthy and varied.

So can you remember what you chose to eat for breakfast? So pop those food choices on the eatwell plate.

So let's say for breakfast, let's say you had egg on toast.

Where would those two food products go? Yes, the toast would go in the carbohydrate section, and the egg would go in the protein section.

So that means that I've got carbohydrates and a protein already.

Now, I've got to then think about what else I need in my diet.

What's missing.

So what's missing is my fruit and vegetables and my dairy items. So now you can sort of think about what you've selected for lunch and what you selected for dinner.

So you can download this eatwell plates and you can have a go at completing it and see and if your diet that you've planned is healthy and varied.

So pause the video, have a go.

Excellent.

So hopefully you've had a go now and you may have missed one item off your meal plan.

So if you have, it's a really easy fix, just think about modifying your meal plan.

Now this is a really good strategy for making sure you're eating healthy every day.

Planning what meals you're going to eat.

Okay, so now we're going to look at how to select from a range of ingredients.

And what we're going to focus on is we're actually going to focus on the food product that we're going to explore next session.

So we are going to be thinking about designing a soup.

But before we design the soup, we need to think about what ingredients we can select to go into a soup.

So I want you to think about and we're going to explore what ingredients we may use to actually design a soup.

So what I'd like you to do as one of your first tasks, is I'd like you to look at the Eatwell Guide and I'd like you to write down a list of foods that you could put into a soup.

So pause the video, have access to the Eatwell Guide and write down all of the foods that could go into a soup.

Okay, so hopefully you've done that.

So here's an example.

So I've looked at the Eatwell Guide.

I've used the blank Eatwell Guide plates and I've actually noted down some of the foods.

So a soup I could add the vegetables to.

I could put bread in a soup, or I could have bread to accompany the soup.

I could put potato in the soup so I can have vegetables from the Eatwell Guide.

I can have carbohydrates.

I could add milk to add some dairy products into the soup.

I could add cheese.

I could even add cream.

I could add meat to my soup, beans and pulses.

So that would show you how you can design and select ingredients for a soup that makes it healthy and varied.

So although it's a single dish, we still need to think about making sure it's a balanced dish.

So how do we begin to select ingredients for a soup? Now, remember, we need to think about our previous lesson.

If you remember back to the previous lesson, we actually developed a questionnaire to find out what our user wants.

Now, if you didn't get involved in that lesson, that's not a problem because we can go through this task today.

So you can identify an end-user.

So it might be someone in your household.

But if you remember, we need to think about the users' needs.

We need to think about what the user wants.

So these are some questions that you might have already asked, or you can ask an end-user.

We need to think about the preferences and we need to think about the values.

So I'm just going to remind you what each of those words mean.

So when we talk about needs, we're talking about what the user needs in their diet.

So they might need something for religious reasons.

So they might not be able to eat a certain food because of their religion.

They might have dietary needs.

They might need certain foods in their diet because they're lacking in that nutrient.

And so they might need extra vitamins but they might have a dietary requirements.

They might have needs based on nutrition.

So needs are things that someone actually needs in their diet to ensure they are healthy or it could be based on their values.

So have a little think about what your user needs.

Go back to those questions you asked.

And if you haven't asked those questions, you could pause the video at this point and you could ask an end-user if someone else is in your household to ask.

So have a little think about what their needs are.

And then we need to think about their wants.

So in terms of wants, we would ask them questions to ensure we got a varied soup selection from each of those sections on the Eatwell Guide.

So we've got fruits and vegetables, carbohydrates, proteins and dairy and alternatives.

So we need to find out, okay, so from the fruits and vegetables, what do you want, what is your choice? And they might tell you what their favourite vegetables are.

Carbohydrates, get them to tell you what their favourite carbohydrates are.

And then get them to select proteins and dairy and alternatives.

So again, you might want to pause the video at this point go back to the questions you asked in the previous lesson.

If you didn't ask any questions, find out if one of your person in your household, what do they want from the soup? What sort of vegetables would they want in it? What carbohydrates would they want in it? Would they like to put rice in their soup or pasta or potato or bread? What are their wants and what proteins would they like in their soup.

Because we need to make sure it's balanced.

Okay, so now we're going to move on to preferences.

So this is where you can go back to the users' preferences.

So your user might have a preferred preference in terms of tastes.

So they might not like the taste of certain vegetables.

They might not like the taste of a certain carbohydrates.

So find out what sort of tastes they like.

Find out what sorts of textures they like.

What sort of smells they like.

What would they like in terms of appearance? So if I was to make a pea and broccoli soup, what would that soup look like? Yeah, it'd be very green, and that for some, might be quite off putting.

So they might have preferences in terms of how the soup looks.

So it needs to be appealing.

So pause the video at this point, go back to your questions that you'd asked previously and think about what your user said in terms of their preferences.

And again, if you didn't take part in that lesson, it's not a problem.

Speak to your end user now and find out what are their preferences and make a note in your book or on your piece of paper.

So pause the video, have a little go and then come back to me when you are done.

Okay, so hopefully now you know what your users' needs are, wants and preferences.

And then finally we need to think about what your user value is.

So what are their values in terms of where the food is sourced from? Does your user want fruits and vegetables that's so organic? That's not been mass produced? Does your user have values in terms of nutrition? Does your user value in terms of cost? Obviously, if they want a low-cost soup, you need to think about what sorts of ingredients would be low cost.

So again, you're going to pause the video, you're going to go back to those questions that you asked your end-user previously, in terms of values.

What are their values? Okay, so now we have an idea of our users wants, preferences, needs and values.

And what you're going to do now, your going to either draw or download the blank eatwell plate, and you are going to use feedback from your end user.

So it could be at the feedback that you got previously.

And like I say, if you weren't part of that lesson, you can get that feedback now.

And I want you to write down all of the ingredients that you may use to design your soup.

And I want you to think about having considered your users' needs, their wants, their preferences and their values.

And just make sure that the ingredients that you've selected covers all of the sections from the Eatwell Guide.

And then we should have a list of ingredients that we can work with to design a soup that's healthy and varied.

So pause the video, have a go at this task.

Once you've completed the task, come back to me and then we will move on to looking at how we're going to design our soup.

Brilliant, okay.

So hopefully now you've got a list of ingredients in which we can work with.

So what we're going to do now is we're going to move on.

And we're going to look at how to design a soup.

Okay, so now we're going to look at how to design a soup.

We're going to look at designing a soup that addresses our users' wants, needs, preferences and values.

We're going to explore some ideas of the recipes for soups.

And then when we've looked at other ideas, we're going to look at using it to develop our own.

So your task is to explore a range of example recipe cards.

And I'll talk you through these different recipes.

There are recipe cards for different soups and I would like you to evaluate them.

So in terms of evaluate, I want you to look at them and look at what's good about that dish and what's not so good.

What can you change? And I want you to think about when you were evaluating it.

I want you to think about the users' needs, wants, preferences and values.

Where the food has come from and the seasonality of the ingredients.

We'll think about how the food has been processed.

And remember, we want a balanced and varied recipe idea for a soup that's going to make our end-user healthy.

So the first recipe card is a tomato soup.

So you can see the list of ingredients there.

So we've got vegetable oil, onion, garlic, tomato puree, chopped tomatoes, and we've got bicarbonate soda and milk and we've got a basil leaf.

Now, when we evaluate this, we need to think about the users' needs, wants, preferences and values.

Now, they might not like for instance, basil leaf.

So if they don't like a basil leaf, we need to replace that.

They might prefer fresh foods.

They might value fresh foods.

So when it comes to kind of chopped tomatoes that's processed, they might prefer you to use fresh tomatoes.

So I want you to use the recipe card and reflect back to your users' needs, wants, preferences and values.

And evaluate your chosen recipe card.

And it gives you a method.

So it might be that you evaluate the method and you look at how that could be modified to address your users' needs and wants.

The next recipe card is a vegetable soup.

So the vegetable soup is made up of a mixture of vegetables and it's suggested, onions, celery and carrots.

But it's also giving you the option to replace that.

So your user might not like celery.

That might be their preference.

Or they might need a particular food in their diet.

Your user could be dairy intolerance, so therefore the creme fraiche would not address their needs.

So you need to think about evaluating the recipe card based on your users' needs, wants, preferences and values.

So this is a vegetable soup, and this is the method of how to create the vegetable soup.

And then the next recipe card is a chicken soup.

So looking at the chicken soup, as you can see it's got a list of a larger list of ingredients which includes onions, carrots, chicken stock, frozen peas, tinned sweetcorn, cooked rice and cooked chicken.

So there's a lot of ingredients on there that are pre-cooked.

There is a lot of ingredients on there that's processed.

So think about what your user wants, think about their needs and their values, and think about whether this recipe card would meet those.

And then it talks about how you would actually make that soup.

So it talks you through the method.

So what I'd like you to do is I would like you now to select one recipe card and look at how you can develop it by adapting it, changing or substituting one or more ingredients.

I want you to evaluate the soup.

So you might choose the chicken soup.

If you choose the chicken soup, you need to evaluate it based on your users' needs, wants, preferences and values.

So by evaluating it, what I mean is you need to look at the advantages, you need to look at the disadvantages.

And then when you're looking at the disadvantages, then you can make the choice about what you might change and modify about that soup to make it suitable for your end user.

And I would like you to annotate your ideas.

So what I mean, I'd like you to explain your thinking.

So here's a blank recipe card for you.

Take the soup, choose the soup.

So you're choosing either tomato, vegetable, or chicken.

And you are adapting that recipe card based on your users' needs, wants.

So by annotating, what I mean is if you make a change, I would like you to annotate to explain why you've made that change.

Give a reason based on your users' needs wants, preferences and values.

Does that make sense? So you need to pause the video at this point, you need to access the recipe card via the worksheets or you can draw this table out on your piece of paper or in your book.

And I would like you to adapt one of those recipe cards.

So you can access the recipe card by downloading the worksheets, and look at them on your screen.

And I would like you to evaluate one of them based on your users' need.

So I'll leave that task on there to help you remind you what you need to do.

So pause the video, have a go at that task and then resume the video once you're finished.

Brilliant, okay.

So you've had a go now, so hopefully now, you've got a recipe that's designed specifically for your end-user.

So that is how we would design a food product.

We'd actually create a method sheet, a recipe card, and we do often use ideas by research in over soup designs.

So a suggestion for you, is to look at lots of recipe cards on the internet and actually see what's out there, because next lesson we're actually going to be designing and making our very own soup.

Okay, so let's remind ourselves what we've learned and what we've looked at this lesson.

We've used lots of key words.

So let's just remind ourselves about those key words.

We spoke a lot about being healthy and that's to be fit and well.

So we want to design a food product that makes our user fit and healthy.

We've spoke a lot about varied.

And hopefully now, you understand now more what we mean when we say varied.

We need a broad range of foods in our diet.

And we use the Eatwell Guide to help us, don't worry.

We also need to think about values and what people value in terms of their choices.

So some people have values relating to their religious beliefs.

So their religion might mean that they can't eat a certain food or that certain food needs to be processed in a certain way.

And we need to respect our users' values and make sure that food addresses those values to shape the person's diet.

Nutrition is where that we spoke about a lot.

So all of the foods that we select are high in different nutritional content.

And nutrition is the process of providing or obtaining food that's necessary for our health and growth.

So we do need to think about nutrition.

We have a key word that we've used, is preferences.

So we considered that a person would choose things based on their preference.

So that's what they want.

We've also spoke about users wants, and that refers to the things that we desire to eat.

So preferences is selecting from a list, want is about a person's desires.

And then we spoke about what a person needs in their diet.

So some people have needs such as they can't eat certain foods.

So they might be lactose intolerance.

They might have an allergy to a certain food product and that is a need.

That's not a preference.

That has to happen to make sure they're not poorly.

And we've also spoke about the word diet.

And this is the food that a person chooses to eat because of their wants, needs or values.

So hopefully you've have fun this lesson and you've explored how to select from a range of ingredients to go into a soup.

And you've had a chance to actually design your own soup.

So next lesson, we're going to look at making your own soup.

So we'll be looking at different techniques to prepare and cook and combine ingredients to make a delicious soup.

So if you'd like to share any of the work that you've done today, please ask an adult to share it on Twitter using @OakNational or using the #LearnwithOak.

I had a really good lesson today with you.

So I look forward to seeing you next lesson.

And I hope you enjoy the rest of your week.

Thank you for listening, bye.