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Hello.

I'm Mrs Enock, your Design and technology teacher, Cooking and nutrition: the healthy and varied diets.

Today's lesson, we're going to be looking at exploring food and where it comes from.

A lesson with a lot of information.

I'm very excited to get started.

Are you too? Oh, I do hope so.

Let's go and see what we're learning about in today's lesson.

Let's look at what we will explore in today's lesson.

We're going to learn that food is either grown, reared or caught.

We're going to learn about a healthy and varied diet.

We're going to organise our food using the Eatwell plate to help us.

Keywords.

Let's look at some of the keywords we'll explore today.

Grown, can you say it? Well done, grown is when something is growing from a seed to be processed and eaten.

Reared, can you say reared? Excellent, reared is to breed and raise an animal to use as food to be processed and eaten.

Fresh, can you say fresh? Super, fresh is a food which has not been cooked or processed.

Pre-cooked, can you say pre-cooked? Super, pre-cooked is a food which has been cooked before being packaged.

Caught, can you say caught? Great, caught is when a food is caught to be processed and eaten.

For example, fish.

Finally, processed.

Can you say processed? Super, processed is how food is altered to change the properties of the ingredients.

Let's look at how food is either grown, reared or caught.

We need to ask ourselves the question where does that food come from? And the answer is not the supermarket.

Have a think.

Use the pictures to help you.

Once you've had a think, press resume and we'll carry on learning together.

Ready? Press pause.

Did you come up with lots of ideas? Well done if you did.

Where does our food come from? Our food is either grown, for example, tomatoes.

It is reared, for example, chickens.

Or is caught for example, mussels.

Where does our food come from? Have a look at these pictures, they might look different and they certainly taste different but they have something in common.

Do you know what it is? That's right, they are grown.

All of these foods have been grown from a seed before they've been processed and eaten.

These foods are grown.

In a moment, I'd like you to pause the video to complete this task.

Foods that grow.

I'd like you to either draw, write or tell someone about all the foods you know that have been grown.

When you've done that press resume and we'll carry on learning together.

Ready? Off you go.

Did you come up with lots of ideas? Well done if you did.

Let's explore foods that are grown a little bit further.

Have a look at this picture.

Can you tell what it is? That's right, it's lettuce.

Have a look at this picture.

Can you name what it is? And that's right, it's the strawberry.

Do you see the strawberries in the background? Do you notice their different colour? What do you think that means? That's right, the green strawberries mean they're not ripe and not ready to be picked.

Can you name this plant that we eat? That's right, it's oranges.

Isn't it interesting to see how the oranges grow on the trees? Have a look at this picture.

Look carefully, do you see the plants that we eat? That's right, it's a pineapple.

Who knew pineapple grew that way? So interesting.

Let's look at some more.

What is this plant that we eat? Do you recognise it? That's right, it's a banana.

Who knew bananas grew that way upon the tree? What do you notice about the colour? That's right, the bananas in the first picture are not ripe, they're not ready to be picked and eaten.

What about this plant that we eat? Do you recognise it? That's right.

It's the potato.

Potato has been dug up and washed ready for us to eat.

Have a look at this picture.

Can you name that plants we eat? Super, it's the pea.

As you can see the pea is being packed and the shell has been taken off, sorry the shell's been picked and the shell has been taken off, ready for us to eat.

Have a look at this plant.

Do you recognise it? It's the cucumber.

Isn't it interesting to see how cucumbers actually grow? Here's a quick task to check what we know.

Have a look at the full foods below.

Can you pick out the ones that have been grown? There might be more than one answer.

Carrots, salmon, chicken, apples, have a think.

Carrots are grown a field, they are harvested.

Chickens are reared.

Apples are grown in an orchard, they are harvested.

Salmon is caught from the sea.

Did you get carrots and apples? Well done if you did, those two foods are grown.

Have a look at these foods.

What do they have in common? That's right, these foods have been reared.

Reared means to breed and raise an animal to use as food to be processed and eaten.

It's very important to mention that some people choose not to eat food that has been reared either for religious, cultural or personal preferences.

And that's okay.

It's important for us to know where food can come from so then we can make decisions about what we eat and how we keep ourselves happy and healthy.

Let's have a look.

In a moment, I'd like you to pause the video to complete your task.

Foods that are reared.

Draw, write or tell someone all the foods that are reared.

When you've done press resume and we'll carry on learning together.

Ready? Off you go.

Did you come up with lots of ideas? Well done if you did.

Let's have look at these pictures.

Food which is reared.

There's sausage, bacon and pork chop, and they all come from the same animal which has been reared.

Have you guessed? The animal is a pig.

Let's make it another, food which is reared.

Beef burger, beef mince, and steak , all come from an animal which has been reared.

Do you know the animal? That's right, it's a cow.

Let's have a look at this task below to help us understand what the word reared means.

Which of these foods have been reared? Roast chicken, battered cod, hamburger, apple pie.

Have a think.

Chickens can be reared to be eaten.

Cows can be reared, this meat is called beef.

Apples are grown in an orchard.

The pastry is a processed food made by combining flour and butter together.

Cod is caught from the sea.

The batter is a processed food.

Well done if you recognised what foods are reared.

Let's have a look at these foods.

Where do these foods come from? They all have something in common, do you know what it is? That's right, all these foods have been caught to be processed and eaten.

This food source originally lived in a water, which makes it caught.

For example, salmon, prawns, mussels cod have all been caught.

I'd like you to pause the video to complete this task.

Foods that are caught.

Draw, write or tell someone all the foods that are caught.

Press resume once you're finished.

Ready? Off you go.

Did you come up with lots of ideas? I bet you did.

Food which is caught.

Food which is caught is often food from the sea and other waters.

For example, prawns, lobster, cod, salmon, mussels and tuna.

Let's do this task together and check our understanding.

From the foods below, which foods do you think have been caught? Salmon steak, battered Cod, mussels, tuna.

Have a little think.

Did you guess correctly? Salmon has been caught from the sea.

Mussels have been caught from the sea.

Tuna has been caught from the sea.

Cod is caught from the sea.

The batter is a processed food.

They were all caught from the sea.

Did you get it right? Well done if you did.

Now again, to look at the importance of a healthy and varied diet.

Healthy and varied diet, it is important to eat a wide range of foods for healthy and varied diet.

Have a look at the little boy in this picture and you see what his favourite food is.

That's right, it's pancakes.

Do you have a favourite food? Hmm, that sounds quite nice.

I have a favourite food as well.

I really like mashed potato.

But I want you to have a think.

It might seem nice to only eat your favourite food but what would happen if you only ate that food and nothing else ever? Press pause and have a little think.

Hello again? Did you have a think on what would happen if you only ate one type of food? Might get a little bit boring after a while? Might not be your favourite food after all.

Having lots of different food means it's varied.

It means you're not just having the same food over and over again.

So what foods do you include in a healthy and varied diet? In a moment I'd like you to press pause and have a think about all the foods that you enjoy, but remember we're focusing on healthy and varied.

Varied meaning different, different types of food.

Press pause, I mean press resume when you're done.

Off you go.

Did you come up with a long list of healthy foods and varied foods to eat? Well done if you did.

So the food in these pictures look quite appetising.

We've got stir-fried prawns, stir-fried vegetables.

We've got looking like dips and moist tuna, a pasta dish and some delicious asparaguses.

Healthy and varied diet.

Now, I bet if you asked your friends what they would choose to eat you'll probably have a lot of different answers and that's okay.

There are lots of factors that can influence the foods that you choose for your healthy and varied diet.

Let's have a look at what those factors could be.

Allergies, people need to avoid certain foods if they are allergic to them.

If somebody is allergic to a food, it would not be a good choice as part of their healthy and varied diet.

Religion and culture.

People choose not to eat certain foods because of their religion and culture.

And it's really important to recognise and respect that.

Cost, people choose ingredients based on their availability and cost.

It's really important that we respect that as well.

Skills in cooking.

People choose different foods based on their confidence in cooking them.

But there are lots of different reasons that could influence why you would choose certain foods in a healthy and varied diet as well as the ones that you enjoy of course.

This is an Eatwell guide.

It's a really useful piece of information and it helps us understand how we can balance the food we eat, how we can look at the different food types and know we're not only going to spend all day just eating mashed potato because I would only be eating something from the yellow section on the plate.

This plate is called an Eatwell plate or an Eatwell guide.

And we're going to explore what this means together.

So the yellow section carbohydrates.

Carbohydrates, can you say that there's four syllables, car-bo-hy-drates.

Excellent.

Carbohydrates provide us with energy.

They can be found in pasta, bread and potatoes.

Just have a quick pause of the video and see if you can think of any other carbohydrates before we carry on learning.

Ready? Off you go.

Hello again? Did you think of lots of carbohydrates? Well done if you did.

Oh, here are some examples, cereal, porridge, pasta, rice, potatoes and bread.

Did you think of any of those? Well done if you did.

Let's just check our learning, shall we? Which of these foods are a carbohydrate? Pasta, lentils, salmon, bread.

Have a think.

Did you get pasta and bread? Well done if you did.

Pasta is a source of carbohydrate.

Lentils are a source of protein.

Salmon is a source of protein.

Bread is a source of carbohydrates.

Well done if you got that right.

Oh, the pink section on the Eatwell plate are proteins.

Can you say proteins? Pro-teins, excellent.

Now proteins help build muscle.

Proteins are important for growth and they actually help the body repair itself.

Isn't that amazing? Proteins can be found in food like meat and different types of beans.

I'd like you to give the video a quick pause and think of how many proteins you can name Ready? Press resume once you're done.

Off you go? Did you think a lots of proteins? I bet you did, let's have a look at some examples.

We've got different types of nuts, salmon, meat, eggs and different beans and lentils.

Fantastic, let's check our learning.

Which these foods are a protein? You can choose from lentils, oranges, eggs, and strawberries.

Remember there might be more than one, correct answer? Ready? Have a think.

Let's see our answers now, shall we? Did you get lentils and eggs? Well done if you did, lentils and eggs are a source of protein.

Oranges and strawberries are both fruit.

The blue section on the Eatwell plate or the Eatwell guide are dairy and alternatives.

Dairy and alternatives help build fats and minerals.

Dairy is important for minerals like calcium and fats, which give us energy.

An example of an alternative could be you could have dairy milk, which comes from a cow and you could have an alternative which could be coconut milk, which would give you the similar fats and minerals.

Press pause and have a think of as many dairy and alternatives as you can.

When you've done press resume and we'll carry on learning together.

Ready? Off you go.

Did you come up with lots of ideas? I bet you did.

Let's have a look at my example.

Oh, this is a picture with a lot of dairy and alternatives.

We have milk, yoghourt, eggs, coated cheese, cheese and butter.

Let's check out understanding together.

Which of these foods are a dairy or alternative? Pasta, oats, steak, cheese, have a think.

Well done, if you said cheese.

Cheese is a source of dairy or alternative.

Oats and pasta are a source of carbohydrates.

Steak is a source of protein.

The green section.

Do you notice it's the largest part of the Eatwell plate, the Eatwell guide? The green part of the plate are fruits and vegetables Fruits and vegetables provide vital vitamins, minerals and fibre.

Different vitamins have different jobs when helping our body be healthy and strong.

An example of this is vitamin C , helps the body repair itself.

Vitamin C can be found in oranges.

What I'd like you to do is just pause the video and think of as many fruits and vegetables as you can.

Press resume when you're done and we'll carry on learning together.

Ready? Off yo go.

Did you manage to think of lots of foods and vegetables? Di you think of a huge amounts of fruits and vegetables.

Well done if you did, that's excellent.

Oh my goodness.

This is another beautiful picture of suits and vegetables.

It really is like the colours of the rainbow.

I've got an idea let's play a fun little game.

I'll named the fruit and vegetable and you see how quickly you can point to it.

Ready? Pepper.

Did you spot it? Red isn't it? Oranges.

Did you find it? Well done.

Kiwi That's right, it's the green fruit at the bottom of the page.

Cabbage.

Did you point to two answers? There's red cabbage, looks purple and there's the green cabbage.

Let's do two more.

Carrots.

Well done in the orange section and the last one, asparagus.

Can you see it in the bottom corner, the green vegetable, you were good at that.

Well done.

Another section of the Eatwell plate, which is actually on the outside of the plate in a small square, all on its own are fats and oils.

Now fats and oils provide energy.

They can also help store energy in the body and insulate your body against the cold.

Fats and oils can be found in butter and different types of oil like almond oil, vegetable oil or olive oil.

I'd like you to pause the video again.

And you've guessed it, think of as many different fats and oils as you can.

When you're done, press resume and we'll carry on learning together? Ready? Off you go.

Well done, I bet you thought of lots of fats and oils.

Here's an example of some of mine.

I thought of olive oil, I also thought of coconut oil, really great to cook with.

I thought of margarine, almond oil and butter Water.

Water is a really important part of the Eatwell guide or Eatwell plate.

And it has its own section outside of the circular plate.

It's is a glass of water to help us remember.

Now it is recommended to have between six to eight glasses of water a day, and this is really important to help your body be healthy and strong.

Now here's a question.

Can you guess which type of food is not part of the Eatwell plate? Have a think, Can you tell me? I think you've guessed it.

It's sweets and treats.

Eating too much food that is high in fat, salt and sugar, and you want to eat it less often than the other foods we've explored and in small amounts.

Now it's really important to recognise that it's okay to have sweets and treats.

It's important for us to recognise that they're not part of our Eatwell plate and that they really are as the treat.

We're now going to have a look at organising our food using the Eatwell plate to help us.

Here's the Eatwell plate again.

We've put everything back together like a jigsaw really.

Can you see what colour the carbohydrates are? Can you shout it out? That's right, yellow, well done.

What about the protein, what kind of place is the protein? That's right, pink, well done.

What colour are dairy? Blue, excellent.

And do you remember what sorts of food is not part of the Eatwell plate? Hey, you've guessed it, it's the sweets and treats that we want to eat less often and in small amounts.

We're going to organise our food using the Eatwell plate.

In a moment, I'd like you to pause the video and complete this task using the worksheet to help you.

Can you draw different items onto the Eatwell plate? I've given you some pictures to help get you started.

When you're done press resume and we'll carry on learning together.

So your task is to draw and if you can label the different food items onto your Eatwell plate.

Ready? Off you go.

I bet you worked really hard on your Eatwell plate.

Do you feel proud of it? You should feel proud of it especially if you've worked hard on it.

We've done a lot in today's lesson.

Let's see what we explored.

We understood that food is grown, reared and caught.

And we've gotten to explore what it means about having a healthy and varied diet We organised food using the Eatwell plate or the Eatwell guide to help us.

We've done a lot of work today.

And I've really enjoyed working with you.

If you're able to share your work with Oak National, if you'd like you could ask a parent or carer to share your work on Twitter, tagging @OakNational or #LearnwithOak as I would love to see your Eatwell plates.

But well done for today's lesson.

I've had a lot of fun and I've enjoyed doing learning with you.

Take care and I'll see you soon.

Bye.