Who won the Peloponnesian wars?

In this lesson, we will learn about the conflict between the city states of Athens and Sparta, known as the Peloponnesian wars.

Who won the Peloponnesian wars?

In this lesson, we will learn about the conflict between the city states of Athens and Sparta, known as the Peloponnesian wars.

Lesson details

Key learning points

  1. The difference between Athens and Sparta.
  2. The Spartan elite army.
  3. How Athens tried to defend itself.

Licence

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5 Questions

Q1.
What is philosophy?
The area of mathematics concerned with the study of shapes and objects.
Correct answer: The study of the nature of life, truth, knowledge and other important human matters.
Q2.
Which philosopher is referred to as the 'Father of Western philosophy'?
Aristotle
Plato
Correct answer: Socrates
Q3.
What was Socrates accused of?
Correct answer: Corrupting the minds of young Athenians.
Murder
Theft
Q4.
Which branch of mathematics did Plato think was the key to learning about the universe?
Algebra
Arithmetic
Correct answer: Geometry
Q5.
Which philosopher tutored Alexander the Great?
Correct answer: Aristotle
Plato
Socrates

5 Questions

Q1.
Ultimately, which city-state lost the Peloponnesian War?
Correct answer: Athens
Sparta
Q2.
After their war against the Persian Empire, Athens and Sparta agreed to be at peace. For how long was the peace meant to last?
13 years
3 years
30 days
Correct answer: 30 years
Q3.
In which city-state were boys trained to be soldiers from a young age?
Athens
Correct answer: Sparta
Q4.
How long did the First Peloponnesian War last for?
10 days
10 months
Correct answer: 10 years
100 years
Q5.
Once it surrendered, which city-states wanted the city of Athens to be destroyed and its people enslaved? Tick two.
Correct answer: Corinth
Delphi
Sparta
Correct answer: Thebes

Lesson appears in

UnitHistory / Ancient Greece

History