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Lesson details

Key learning points

  1. In this lesson, we will continue our understanding of independent clauses and subordinate clauses. We will use this knowledge to think about how we add more that one subordinate clause to give more information to our independent clauses.

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5 Questions

Q1.
An independent clause...
Correct answer: must be understood by itself.
must have a subordinate clause.
must have extra information added to it.
Q2.
A subordinate clause...
Correct answer: must be added to an independent clause.
must be understood by itself.
must have a comma.
Q3.
What's wrong with this sentence? "Although it was Tuesday afternoon, Charlie decided to go to the sweet shop, down the road."
The capital letters are incorrect.
Correct answer: There is a comma after the independent clause, before the next subordinate clause.
There is not a comma before the independent clause.
There is nothing wrong with this sentence.
Q4.
What's wrong with this sentence? "at the football match, He decided to buy chips but he dropped them when cheering."
Correct answer: The capital letters are incorrect.
There is a comma after the independent clause, before the next subordinate clause.
There is not a comma before the independent clause, after the first subordinate clause.
There is nothing wrong with this sentence.
Q5.
What's wrong with this sentence? "During my drama exam, I forgot all my lines because I was so nervous."
The capital letters are incorrect.
There is a comma after the independent clause, before the next subordinate clause.
There is not a comma before the independent clause, after the first subordinate clause.
Correct answer: There is nothing wrong with this sentence.

Lesson appears in

UnitEnglish / Avoiding fragments, fused sentences and comma splices. Using capital letters and writing in the past tense. Using multiple subordinate clauses, punctuating lists correctly when in a complex sentence.

English