New
New
Year 2

Preparing the introduction of a report on The Great Fire of London

I can prepare the introduction of a non-chronological report about the Great Fire of London.

New
New
Year 2

Preparing the introduction of a report on The Great Fire of London

I can prepare the introduction of a non-chronological report about the Great Fire of London.

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Lesson details

Key learning points

  1. The introduction of an information text should hook the reader in and make them want to read the full report.
  2. Introductions often contain questions to the reader.
  3. An introduction may contain some general facts and information to gain the reader’s interest.
  4. An introduction may end with a command which is a direct order or instruction telling the reader to continue reading.

Common misconception

Pupils may struggle to know if adjectives are positive or negative.

Display lists of positive and negative adjectives on the wall and generate example sentences together.

Keywords

  • Introduction - An introduction tells the reader what the report is about and tries to entice them to read on.

  • Prepare - To get something ready or organise to do a certain task.

  • Command - A command is a direct order or instruction telling someone to do something.

You may want to pre-select information texts from your book corner so pupils can see and read introductions for themselves.
Teacher tip

Licence

This content is © Oak National Academy Limited (2024), licensed on Open Government Licence version 3.0 except where otherwise stated. See Oak's terms & conditions (Collection 2).

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6 Questions

Q1.
Which of these best describes the word 'formal'?
when something, or someone, is relaxed
when something, or someone, is upset and angry
Correct answer: when something, or someone, is using a serious, impersonal and unemotional tone
Q2.
What is it called when a writer uses two adjectives to describe a noun?
expanded adjective phrase
Correct answer: expanded noun phrase
expanded phrase
Q3.
Which expanded noun phrase would be suitable to use in a formal report?
Correct answer: dangerous, fast-moving fire
roaring, monstrous fire
evil, dazzling fire
Q4.
Are contractions such as 'didn't' allowed to be used in a formal report?
yes
Correct answer: no
sometimes
Q5.
A writer may choose to include questions in a non-chronological report on the Great Fire of London, but who are the questions directed to?
the writer themselves
Correct answer: the reader
the people in London in 1666
Q6.
What else can be included in a writer's questions to the reader?
greetings
Correct answer: information about the topic
clues to help them solve a mystery

6 Questions

Q1.
Which of these is not a feature of a non-chronological report?
title
introduction
Correct answer: made-up characters
subheadings
paragraphs
Q2.
What comes at the start of a non-chronological report?
Correct answer: an introduction
a paragraph about a particular part of the topic
information about the writer
Q3.
Which of these is one of the purposes of an introduction?
to give the reader detailed information about a specific subject
Correct answer: to give the reader the most basic information
to give the reader the title of the report
Q4.
What is the name for a guide that helps you know what to do and how to do it?
a pan
Correct answer: a plan
a plane
Q5.
What could a writer start their introduction with to spark their reader's interest and entice them to keep reading?
a command
Correct answer: a question
a subheading
Q6.
Which of these adjectives would be most effective at making your report sound appealing to read?
Correct answer: interesting
long
boring