Year 4

Representing the seven times table

Year 4

Representing the seven times table

Lesson details

Key learning points

  1. In this lesson, we will look at a range of representations for multiplications in the seven times table before creating our own concrete, pictorial and abstract representations. We will also briefly introduce commutative law when using written multiplication equations.

Licence

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5 Questions

Q1.
Which of the following numbers is not a multiple of 9?
108
Correct answer: 139
171
72
Q2.
The 10 x 10 grid has been used to help represent the nine times table. But which multiple of 9 is circled?
An image in a quiz
45
Correct answer: 54
63
72
Q3.
During the lesson, we used a counting stick to help recite the nine times table. But what value is the arrow pointing at?
An image in a quiz
45
54
Correct answer: 63
72
Q4.
Using my knowledge of the 9x multiplication table, I can find larger multiples of nine. But which of the following numbers is NOT a multiple of nine?
Correct answer: 299
405
567
927
Q5.
Which of the following number sentences is incorrect?
9 x 10 = 18 x 5
9 x 4 = 3 x 12
Correct answer: 9 x 5 = 18 x 3
9 x 6 = 27 x 2

5 Questions

Q1.
Using your knowledge of the 7x table, can you identify which of the following numbers is NOT a multiple of 7?
Correct answer: 114
147
210
7007
Q2.
During the lesson we used a counting stick to represent the 7x multiplication table. What value is represented by the arrow?
An image in a quiz
14
21
Correct answer: 28
35
Q3.
We used a blank grid to help represent the multiples of seven. Which multiple of seven is represented by the circle?
An image in a quiz
35
42
49
Correct answer: 56
Q4.
Arrays are one such pictorial and concrete representation we can make to show multiplication facts. But which of the facts below is not shown by the array?
An image in a quiz
63 ÷ 7 = 9
Correct answer: 63 x 2 = 126
7 x 3 x 3 = 63
7 x 9 = 63
Q5.
When solving a written equation such as 8 x 6, we are able to swap the order of the numbers so we can write it as 6 x 8. This a mathematical law known as:
Associative law
Correct answer: Commutative law
Distributive law
Multiplication law