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Lesson details

Key learning points

  1. In this lesson, we will continue to develop our skills in planning how to solve, and then solving, a fractional measurement problem. The problem is a continuation of determining what lengths of wood could be used in various combinations to achieve a given length.

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5 Questions

Q1.
Ryan makes a flag pole. From lengths of one metre, half a metre and quarter of a metre, he chooses 6. What is the longest length his flag pole could be?
5 and a half metres
5 metres
Correct answer: 6 metres
Q2.
Ryan makes a flag pole. From lengths of one metre, half a metre and quarter of a metre, he chooses 6. What is the shortest length his flag pole could be?
Correct answer: 1 and a half metres
1 and a quarter metres
1 and three quarter metres
Q3.
Ryan makes a flag pole. From lengths of one metre, half a metre and quarter of a metre, he chooses 3 quarter metres and 3 half metres. What will the length of the flag pole be?
2 and a half metres
Correct answer: 2 and a quarter metres
2 metres
Q4.
Ryan makes a flag pole. From lengths of one metre, half a metre and quarter of a metre, he chooses 3 metre lengths and 3 quarter metre lengths. What will the length of the flag pole be?
3 and a half metres
3 and a quarter metres
Correct answer: 3 and three quarter metres
Q5.
Ryan makes a flag pole. From lengths of one metre, half a metre and quarter of a metre, he chooses 4 half metre lengths and 2 quarter metre lengths. What will the length of the flag pole be?
Correct answer: 2 and a half metres
2 and a quarter metres
2 and three quarter metres