Year 7
Year 7

Introduction to Poetry: Metre

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Lesson details

Key learning points

  1. In this lesson, we will introduce the basics of poetic metre and identify poetic metre and its effect.

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5 Questions

Q1.
Which of these sentences does NOT use the word rhythm correctly?
In a poem, the rhythm can make you read really fast or make you go slower.
In some poems, the rhythm makes you put all your focus on certain words.
Correct answer: This poem includes three rhythms and two similes.
This song has the kind of rhythm which makes you shake your hips.
Q2.
Which of these is NOT important to consider when thinking about rhythm in poetry?
The pace of the sounds in a poem.
The stress we put on different sounds in a poem.
Correct answer: The title of the poem.
The way that the poet has made words flow.
Q3.
What do we do when we talk that helps to create rhythm when we read poetry aloud?
Correct answer: We naturally stress some parts of words more than others.
We shout some words and say some words really quietly.
We stress all of our words in the same way.
Q4.
How many syllables are in the word rhythm?
Four.
One.
Three.
Correct answer: Two.
Q5.
Which of the following does the rhythm in a poem help to create?
A sense of the pace in a poem.
A sense of the sounds in a poem.
Correct answer: All of these answers.
The mood and atmosphere of a poem.

9 Questions

Q1.
What do we do when we speak naturally?
Place stress and unstress on words
Place stress on all the words.
Place stress on long words.
Correct answer: Place stress on particular parts of words.
Q2.
What do we call a ‘long’ syllable, which we emphasise?
Correct answer: A stressed syllable.
A stressful syllable.
A stressless syllable.
An unstressed syllable.
Q3.
What do we call a ‘short’ syllable, which we don’t emphasise?
A stressed syllable
A stressful syllable
A stressless syllable
Correct answer: An unstressed syllable
Q4.
In which of these words is the first syllable stressed?
Demand
Correct answer: Flower
Hopeful
Pot
Q5.
In which of these words is the final syllable stressed?
Correct answer: Demand
Flower
Hopeful
Pot
Q6.
Which of these words seems to have even stress on both syllables?
Demand
Flower
Correct answer: Hopeful
Pot
Q7.
Which of the following tells us what metre is?
The rhyme scheme of a poem.
The way a poet uses figurative language.
Correct answer: The way that rhythm is organised and measured in a poem.
The way that stanzas are organised in a poem.
Q8.
Which of these statements is true about iambic pentameter?
Correct answer: It is a poetic metre that includes five pairs of stressed and unstressed syllables per line.
It is a poetic metre that includes three pairs of stressed and unstressed syllables per line.
It is a poetic metre that includes two pairs of stressed and unstressed syllables per line.
Q9.
Which of these lines is written in iambic pentameter?
'Smile though your heart is aching'.
Correct answer: 'So foul and fair a day I have not seen'.
'Wind rages and roars outside'.