New
New
Year 5

Interpret sets of negative and positive numbers in a range of contexts

I can interpret sets of negative and positive numbers in a range of contexts.

New
New
Year 5

Interpret sets of negative and positive numbers in a range of contexts

I can interpret sets of negative and positive numbers in a range of contexts.

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Lesson details

Key learning points

  1. For negative temperatures, the further the number is from zero, the colder it is

Common misconception

Negative temperatures relate to positive e.g. −5℃ is warmer than −3℃ because 5℃ is warmer than 3℃.

Emphasise directional relationship e.g. numbers decrease as they move to the right. Practical examples can help e.g. freezer temperature.

Keywords

  • Temperature - How hot or cold something is.

  • Elevation - Used to describe an object’s height above a given height, such as sea level.

Take practical opportunities where possible to show pupils positive and negative numbers e.g. using fridge and freezer temperatures or local multi-storey structures.
Teacher tip

Licence

This content is © Oak National Academy Limited (2024), licensed on Open Government Licence version 3.0 except where otherwise stated. See Oak's terms & conditions (Collection 2).

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6 Questions

Q1.
Tick all of the options where the numbers are arranged in ascending order.
Correct answer: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
5, 4, 3, 2, 1
Correct answer: 3, 9, 52, 106
106, 52, 9, 3
Correct answer: −1, 0, 1
Q2.
Tick all of the negative values.
Correct answer: −1
0
1
0.5
Correct answer: −0.5
Q3.
Match the parts of the thermometer with their descriptions.
An image in a quiz
Correct Answer:a,positive

positive

Correct Answer:b,neither positive nor negative

neither positive nor negative

Correct Answer:c,negative

negative

Q4.
Which positive temperature is the same distance from zero as −20℃?
Correct Answer: 20, twenty, Twenty, 20.0
Q5.
What number is exactly halfway between −7 and −6?
There is no number in between −7 and −6.
−7.5
Correct answer: −6.5
−6.25
−7.25
Q6.
Match the pairs of numbers with their correct differences.
Correct Answer:18 and 34,16

16

Correct Answer:31 and 16,15

15

Correct Answer:−2 and −20,18

18

Correct Answer:−18 and −1,17

17

6 Questions

Q1.
Tick all the statements that are true.
−3℃ is colder than −4℃
The temperature was −6℃. One hour later it was −5℃. It got colder.
Correct answer: −5℃ is warmer than −6℃
Correct answer: The temperature was −10℃. One hour later it was −5℃. It got warmer.
Q2.
Order these temperatures, starting with the coldest.
1 - −40℃
2 - −10℃
3 - −1℃
4 - 0℃
5 - 20℃
Q3.
Use the information in the table to tick all the statements that are true.
An image in a quiz
There is a 7℃ difference between the min and max temperatures in the North Pole.
Correct answer: In October it is warmer in Sydney than it is in the North Pole.
Correct answer: The two places have the same difference between min and max temperatures in Oct.
Correct answer: Temperatures are always negative in the North Pole in October.
Correct answer: There is a 6℃ difference between the min and max temperatures in the North Pole.
Q4.
Use the information in the table to tick all the statements that are true.
An image in a quiz
It is warmer in February in Antarctica than it is in January.
Correct answer: It is colder in February in Antarctica than it is in January.
Correct answer: Temperatures are always negative in January and February in Antarctica.
Correct answer: There is a 13℃ difference between the minimum temperatures in Jan and Feb.
The difference between the minimum and maximum temperatures in January is 5℃.
Q5.
Put the following numbers into ascending order.
1 - −17
2 - −16.5
3 - −2
4 - −0.01
5 - 0
6 - 0.1
Q6.
Tick all of the numbers that would appear between −31.5 and −28 on a number line.
−32
Correct answer: −29.5
Correct answer: −30.25
Correct answer: −31
−27