Year 2

Representing comparative word problems using bar models (Part 1)

Year 2

Representing comparative word problems using bar models (Part 1)

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Lesson details

Key learning points

  1. In this lesson, we will draw comparative bar models to solve word problems.

Licence

This content is made available by Oak National Academy Limited and its partners and licensed under Oak’s terms & conditions (Collection 1), except where otherwise stated.

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5 Questions

Q1.
21 children in the playground. 48 children arrive. Then 16 children leave. How many children are there now?
32
Correct answer: 53
69
85
Q2.
There were 25 people on the top deck of the bus, 14 people on the bottom deck of the bus. Then, 13 people left the bus. How many people were left on the bus?
16
Correct answer: 26
39
41
Q3.
There were 31 people on the top deck of the bus and 18 people on the bottom deck of the bus. Then, 22 people left the bus. How many people were left on the bus?
25
Correct answer: 27
35
49
Q4.
There were 19 children at lunch. 40 more children come to lunch. Then, 25 people left the lunch hall. How many children were left at lunch?
24
25
Correct answer: 34
59
Q5.
22 children in the playground. 33 children arrive. Then 40 children leave. How many children are there now?
Correct answer: 15
16
55
62

5 Questions

Q1.
Sally has two books. Megan has three more. How many books does Megan have?
4
Correct answer: 5
6
7
Q2.
Ben has 12 crayons. Levi has 4 more. How many crayons does Levi have?
10
14
Correct answer: 16
8
Q3.
Levi has 16 crayons. Ben has 4 fewer. How many crayons does Ben have?
10
Correct answer: 12
18
20
Q4.
Lauren bakes 13 cakes. Graham bakes 5 more. How many cakes does Graham bake?
17
Correct answer: 18
8
9
Q5.
Lauren bakes 14 cakes. Graham bakes 3 fewer. How many cakes does Graham bake?
Correct answer: 11
12
17
18